British Cinema, Second World War

Millions Like Us (1943)

One of my all time favourites. This shows us the experiences of British women, during the Second World War. Set in an aircraft factory overseen by Eric Portman’s no nonsense foreman; we share the joys and heartbreak of a small group of women who sign up to do their bit while the men are away. There’s the romantic Celia(Patricia Roc), pragmatic Gwen(Megs Jenkins) and the haughty and elegant Jennifer(Ann Crawford). Despite the differences in their background, these girls become firm friends as they adjust to their new duties.

Celia finds love with a young RAF officer(a baby faced Gordon Jackson), and Jennifer finds herself falling in love with foreman Charlie(Eric Portman). Some of the funniest and most moving scenes in the film are those featuring these two couples.

This really gives you a sense of what life on the homefront was like, aerial bombardments and people from all walks of life being forced to work and live together.  I greatly admire the indomitable spirit of the characters in this; it’s easy to see why this was a real morale booster upon release.

No doubt this film helped women of the time realise the valuable work they could do if they left the kitchen for a change. The war years were tough but for women they brought freedom and independence, as many worked (apart from domestic tasks)for the first time in their lives, life would never be the same when the men returned.

Great performances from the entire cast. Particular praise must go to Eric Portman(one of my favourite actors, someone who should be much better known today)and Ann Crawford(Ann tragically passed away in 1956, aged just 35.)

A little gem that deserves to be better known. I highly recommend it if you haven’t seen it.

 

 

 

 

 

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