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The Stewart Granger Blogathon: Caravan(1946)

Stewart Granger blogathon 1

This is my own entry for my Stewart Granger blogathon. I can’t wait to read all of your entries in a few days time.

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Stewart as Richard Darrell. Screenshot by me.

I’m writing about Caravan, which is one of my favourite Stewart Granger films. Caravan is another fabulous romantic melodrama from British film studio Gainsborough Pictures.

Stewart’s performances in the Gainsborough films of the 1940’s were what first made him a star here in the UK. He is wonderful to watch in these films as the romantic hero. He also has the added benefit of having a bearing and face that makes him look like he is someone who lived in the 18th or 19th century. He never looks out of place in these period films.

I have always liked Stewart Granger. I became a fan of his from the first time that I ever saw him in a film. My introduction to him was the film King Solomon’s Mines. I like Stewart because he has an intensity and a charm about him. He also has that ability to dominate a scene when he is in it. I  especially love how effortlessly he was able to switch between playing the romantic leading man and playing more roguish and tough characters.

                            Stewart convinces as the sweet romantic hero and as a far tougher and darker man too. Screenshots by me. 

Caravan provides him with a character who is a perfect blend of both of those character types. His character Richard Darrell is certainly a sweet natured man most of the time, but he is also incredibly tough, and can become violent when necessary. You wouldn’t want to get on the wrong side of Richard if you could help it, and he is someone who you would certainly want as a friend. 

What is very noticeable about the Gainsborough films is that they were usually very female focused. These films offered extremely strong roles for the actresses of the classic film era. Caravan slightly departs from this tradition of female focus by focusing more upon on Stewart’s character, but the film still gives us two very memorable lead female characters to enjoy as well.

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Jean Kent as Rosal. Screenshot by me.

Jean Kent delivers the standout female performance in my opinion. She steals every scene she appears in as the feisty and fiercely loyal Gypsy dancer, Rosal.

Jean and Stewart have lovely chemistry and sparks clearly fly between them when they share a scene.

Jean makes it clear to us how independent and passionate Rosalis, we can’t help but like her as much as Richard does. Rosal is a strong willed, kind and fearless lady. 

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Anne Crawford as Oriana. Screenshot by me.

Anne Crawford (a much underrated actress, whose life was cut tragically short when she died of Leukaemia, aged just 35)has the seemingly somewhat dull role of the heartbroken woman who pines for her man.

Anne however manages to make the character very sympathetic and far more fleshed out than she at first seems to be. Anne’s character Oriana is really the heart of the film. She is so gentle and kind that you can’t help but like her.

I also like watching Oriana discover an inner strength as the film goes on. Oriana is such a lovely person, and because of that, I for one always feel torn about which lady Richard should end up with at the end of the film.

Caravan is at heart a film about a love triangle. The thing is though that we cannot take sides in this triangle, because we like all three of the people caught up in it. The fact that both ladies genuinely love Richard, and that he genuinely loves them both in return, makes it very difficult to prefer one couple over the other when you watch this one. Well it does for me anyway.  

  Richard with the two loves of his life. Screenshots by me. 

The film is directed by Arthur Crabtree, who had worked as the cinematographer on several Gainsborough films, and who would also direct Madonna Of The Seven Moons, another one starring Stewart Granger. The film is based on the 1943 novel of the same name by Lady Eleanor Smith. Lady Smith had also written The Man In Grey, which had also been adapted for the screen by Gainsborough in 1943 and had become one of their most successful and famous films. The screenplay for Caravan was by Roland Pertwee(The Spy In Black, Pimpernel Smith), who was the father of Jon Pertwee and the grandfather of Sean Pertwee. 

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Dennis Price as Francis. Screenshot by me.

The film begins in late 19th century London. An elderly gentleman is attacked and robbed in the street. He is rescued by the passing Richard Darrell(Stewart Granger).

After Richard helps this man back to his home, he accidentally leaves the manuscript for his novel behind at the man’s home. He returns for it the next day and is encouraged by the gentleman to talk about himself. The gentleman also says he will help publish the novel for Richard. 

We learn in flashback that Richard has long been in love with his childhood friend Oriana(Ann Crawford). The pair are now engaged and are planning to marry, much to the anger and jealousy of the slimy Francis (Dennis Price), who has long hated Richard, and long desired Oriana. Francis is the sort of bully who would dissolve into tears if you gave them a dose of their own medicine in return. 

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Wycroft and Richard meet aboard the ship to Spain. Screenshot by me.

Francis is a cruel and vengeful man and he arranges for Richard to be killed while he is travelling in Spain on business. Francis orders Wycroft (a scene stealing Robert Helpmann)to follow Richard and kill him. This leads to an hilarious scene on the boat trip to Spain where nothing goes right for Wycroft in his attempts to be rid of Richard. 

                                                 Rosal’s dance. Screenshots by me. 

On arrival in Spain, Richard catches the eye of local gypsy dancer, Rosal(Jean Kent), while she performs her dance act at a local tavern. Richard is later brutally assaulted by a group of men under Wycroft’s command and left for dead due to the horrendous nature of his injuries.

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Rosal saves the badly injured Richard. Screenshot by me.

Rosal saves him and slowly nurses him back to health. When he wakes he is suffering from amnesia. He and Rosal fall in love. Very slowly his memory of the past starts to return to him.

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Oriana becomes trapped in a loveless marriage. Screenshot by me.

Back in England Oriana has been told by Francis that Richard has been killed. In a deep despair over the loss of Richard, and also the recent death of her father, she reluctantly agrees to marry Francis for financial security. Francis treats her abominably and she never forgets Richard.

Will Richard get justice for what has happened to him? Will he remember Oriana? Which lady will he end up with? You will have to watch and find out.

All the actors do a terrific job here. The costumes and sets are all very beautiful too. I especially love Anne Crawford’s dresses, and I envy her for getting to wear such lovely outfits.

The two romances at the heart of the film are both very different; one is a relationship based on passion and shared experiences; the other is the love of soulmates. I love that both of the romantic relationships are equally affecting.This isn’t just a romance film though, there is also quite a bit of action and many dark and violent moments in this too. The finale in the swamp is very violent and brutal.

The awful marriage between Francis and Oriana isn’t sugar coated for us either. Francis is clearly mentally and physically abusive towards his wife and she is often powerless against him. There is a scene where Francis forcibly carries her up to their room and forces himself upon her, and this brings to my mind the scene of Rhett carrying Scarlett in Gone With The Wind. We are left in no doubt as to how unpleasant this marriage is. 

The plot is highly melodramatic and it does involve more than a few coincidences occurring to make certain things happen, but the film is so much fun that most viewers should be able to forgive that and just enjoy the film. If you love a good costume drama and are a fan of Stewart Granger, then this is one that I highly recommend to you. 

What do you think of this film?

 

 

 

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8 thoughts on “The Stewart Granger Blogathon: Caravan(1946)”

  1. I’ve yet to see this one but don’t be surprised…. it’s here on the shelf in the movie room as are many Granger film’s not all of which I’ve seen so far. Solomon’s Mines was likely my first Granger film as well. Mom was always a fan of his and introduced me to it as a kid.

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  2. I made sure to watch this film after seeing that you wrote about it. Again, Jimmy is really perfect in this role. He had quite a few fighting/duelling scenes in his films, the apex being in ‘Scaramouche’. I don’t know how long he trained but he made it all look effortless.
    I really wanted Richard to be with Oriane at the beginning though by the second half, I found he and Rosal’s union to be very touching. She *might* have been a bit too possessive! Sir Francis was such a horrid man and a terribly effective villain. He insulted Oriane so distastefully.
    Thank you for bringing this film to my attention! I really loved reading your article. Long live Gainsborough greatness! 😁

    Liked by 1 person

    1. So happy that you enjoyed this one, Erica! Francis was utterly vile. I’m never sure which of the ladies I really want Richard to end up with, they are both great for him. You really can’t beat a good Gainsborough melodrama. 🙂

      I agree with you about him in duelling scenes. He looks like a real pro in Scaramouche.

      Liked by 1 person

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