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What A Character Blogathon 2019: Henry Daniell

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Paula at Paula’s Cinema Club, Aurora at Once Upon A Screen, and Kellee at Outspoken And Freckled, are bringing back the What A Character Blogathon for it’s 8th year! This blogathon is devoted to the character actors of film. Be sure to visit their sites to read all of the entries, I can’t wait to read them all myself. This time I’ve decided to shine the spotlight on the actor Henry Daniell.

When I see Henry’s name appear in the opening credits of a film, I always know that I’m about to be in for a real treat performance wise. That’s because Henry Daniell was one of those rare actors whose performances never disappointed. He was a master of his craft and he is always wonderful to watch. 

Although he played many different characters throughout his career, he was especially  adept at playing villains and authority figures. He could sneer and play cold or disdainful to perfection. He makes such a convincing villain that he makes you want to reach through the screen and slap him.  

Henry is best remembered today for his excellent performance as the sneering, hardhearted, and very cruel headmaster, Mr. Brocklehurst, in Jane Eyre (1943). The character is utterly monstrous on paper, but in Henry’s hands, Brocklehurst becomes even crueller and more hateful than the man we may imagine when we read the book. Henry makes this man so odious and cold that you wonder if he is even human at all. 

       Henry in Jane Eyre. Screenshots by me. 

Henry could dominate and steal even the smallest scene that he appeared in. He always brought his A game to every single performance. He was also one of those actors like George Sanders, Richard Burton, or Claude Rains, who had been blessed with a truly magnificent and distinctive voice.  That voice was always used to great effect. 

Henry Daniell was born in Barnes, London, on the 5th of March 1894. He made his UK stage debut in 1913. The following year he joined up to fight in WW1. Henry joined the 2nd Battalion of the Norfolk Regiment in 1914, and he fought with them until he was invalided out in 1915 after being severely wounded. 

Henry Daniell The Awful Truth
Henry and his co-star Ina Claire in the original lost version of The Awful Truth. Image source Wikimedia Commons.

Henry made his Broadway stage debut in 1921, playing Prince Charles in Clair De Lune. He worked on stage throughout the 1920’s. Henry made his film debut in the 1929 version of The Awful Truth. In this film Henry plays Norman Warriner, the role which would later turn Cary Grant into a star in the 1937 remake. Sadly Henry’s version of this romantic comedy classic is now lost. I don’t know about anyone else, but I for one would have loved to have seen how he approached this role. 

Over the next decade he appeared in many more films, most notably as the sleazy cad, Baron de Varville, in Camille(1936). This was the first film that I ever saw him in, and it is his performance in this film which made me want to see much more of his work.  

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Henry and Charles Laughton in The Suspect. Image source Wikimedia Commons.

Throughout the 1940’s he was in high demand as a villain, appearing in Charlie Chaplin’s The Great Dictator, The Sea Hawk, Jane Eyre,The Suspect, The Body Snatcher, and three of the Basil Rathbone Sherlock Holmes films, in one of which he played Professor Moriarty. He was also in The Philadelphia Story as Sidney Kidd, the publisher of the magazine that Mike and Liz work for. 

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Henry (seated centre)in The Body Snatcher. Image source IMDb.

               Here’s Henry in action opposite Errol Flynn in The Sea Hawk(1940).

Throughout the 1950’s and into the 1960’s, Henry appeared often on television in guest roles. Some notable films and performances from the later part of his career include Witness For The Prosecution, in which he worked again with his co-star in The Suspect, Charles Laughton, Mister Cory(the film that he called one of his favourites from his own work), Voyage To The Bottom Of The Sea, and The Man In The Gray Flannel Suit

His final film role was as the British Ambassador, in George Cukor’s 1964 film adaptation of My Fair Lady. His scenes alongside Audrey Hepburn at the Embassy Ball would sadly be the last he would ever shoot. Henry Daniell died of a sudden heart attack  on October 31st, 1964.  He was 69 years old. 

He left behind him an incredible film legacy. He is one of my favourite character actors. I also consider him to have been one of the best character actors in the business. I hope he would be touched by how much love and respect there still is for his performances and films today. Never seen a Henry Daniell film? A cinematic treasure trove awaits your discovery, and I hope you enjoy exploring his screen work. 

Any other Henry Daniell fans here? 

13 thoughts on “What A Character Blogathon 2019: Henry Daniell”

  1. I particularly love watching Daniell and Karloff in The Body Snatcher. I liken their scenes to enjoying a fine tenor and baritone duet in an opera. Such thorough professionals.

    More with Henry Daniell and Basil Rathbone. Daniell played the villain Henry Abbott in the Broadway production of Kind Lady and Rathbone played the role in the 1935 film. Later, Henry would play the nasty uncle on Broadway in My 3 Angels. The movie version, We’re No Angels, would give Basil a kick at that role. It’s a small world when you are a Brit actor with a withering delivery!

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  2. I remember seeing Daniell in Camille and he made the absolute perfect villain. The evilness was just oozing out of him, I hated his character. A great actor, to be sure. I never knew that he was in The Philadelphia Story or My Fair Lady. I’m going to have to keep an eye out for him now! Thanks for the info, Maddy! This was a cool addition to the blogathon.

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