Blogathons, Drama

The Elizabeth Taylor Blogathon: Cat On A Hot Tin Roof (1958)

Elizabeth Taylor blogathon

Crystal over at In The Good Old Days Of Classic Hollywood is hosting this blogathon all about Elizabeth Taylor. Be sure to visit her site to read all the entries, I can’t wait to read them all myself. 

Elizabeth Taylor was someone famous who I always felt like I knew. I felt this way because I think that Elizabeth was so open about her life; her personal issues, her passions, and her tragedies were very well known to those of us who never actually knew her. Due to her openness, it often felt like you did know her in a way.

Her life was led very much in the public eye and pretty much everything she did was reported on. Elizabeth was one of the biggest film stars there has ever been, yet she didn’t become aloof or self centred, she was actually a very generous and kind person. Elizabeth also did so much for charity and she also helped to raise public awareness of AIDS and addiction.

People liked Elizabeth and they felt like they could relate to her in some way.  Despite the fact that I never met her, I certainly did feel that in a way I had lost someone special when she died in 2011. 

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Elizabeth as Maggie. Screenshot by me.

Elizabeth was also one of the most beautiful women of the 20th century. Sadly it was her looks which were often focused on more than her acting talents were. There was so much more to Elizabeth than just physical beauty. She was a very interesting person and was also a very good dramatic actress.

I’ve decided that I’m going to write about a film that I consider to feature one of her very best film performances. That film is Cat On A Hot Tin Roof.

1958 really was a key year in Elizabeth Taylor’s life. In March of that year her third husband Mike Todd was tragically killed in a plane crash. Elizabeth was left utterly devastated by his death.

At the time that Mike was killed, Elizabeth had been in the middle of filming Cat On A Hot Tin Roof. She had to then finish filming her scenes while she was still in the process of grieving for Mike. Elizabeth and Mike had planned for this to be her last film. Their plan was that she could have then retired from acting.

I’ve no doubt that making Cat On A Hot Tin Roof must have been an extremely difficult experience for Elizabeth; however her performance in this film certainly helped to show audiences how much of a skilled dramatic actress she was capable of being.

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Maggie gets desperate. Screenshot by me.
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Maggie comforts her husband. Screenshot by me.

Elizabeth had had some dramatic roles before this of course, but I think this was really the first film in which we saw just what dramatic heights she could actually reach.     

Cat On A Hot Tin Roof is directed by Richard Brooks. The film is based upon the acclaimed play by Tennessee Williams. The film tells the story of the wealthy Pollitt family. The film doesn’t fully manage to shake off its theatrical roots. Most of the action takes place in one room, and it’s one of those films where characters yell and shout a lot. If that doesn’t sound like it’s your thing, I’d say give it a try because the performances really make it worthwhile.

There is the handsome former football star Brick(Paul Newman). He is grieving the death of his best friend (who it is strongly suggested was also his lover). Brick is struggling with life and his biggest crutch is the regular doses of alcohol that he consumes.

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The troubled Brick. Screenshot by me.

Brick’s young and very beautiful wife Maggie(Elizabeth Taylor)is frustrated over his lack of physical passion for her. She loves him so much, but she cannot reach his heart, and she cannot help him with his grief. She won’t give up trying to reach him though

Brick’s long suffering elder brother Gooper(Jack Carson)and Gooper’s overbearing and shrill wife Mae(Madeleine Sherwood)make life hell for Brick and Maggie. Gooper and Mae are desperate to become the next owners of the family plantation. 

As the family gather together for the milestone birthday of their patriarch Big Daddy(Burl Ives), family frustrations and secrets are revealed; including the sad fact that Big Daddy is slowly dying of cancer. 

This painful revelation about his father forces Brick to step up and take charge of his responsibilities. 

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The tough Big Daddy. Screenshot by me.

There are three love stories in this Brick and Maggie, Brick and Big Daddy, and Brick’s love of the bottle(which is a form of healing and protection from real life for him).The most important of these is that between Brick and Big Daddy. By the end of the film both men have learnt something about the other, and both will develop mutual respect and understanding.  

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The long suffering Big Mama. Screenshot by me.

I think that all of the cast shine here. Judith Anderson delivers solid support as the loving, loyal, but not particularly clever wife of Big Daddy, Anderson makes you really feel for her character.

Newman convinces as the brooding, pent up and reclusive Brick. He makes you want to yell at Brick, and he makes you want to tell him to snap out of his current state. For me though it is Burl Ives and Elizabeth Taylor who deliver the best and most memorable performances in this film.

Burl is excellent as the strong Big Daddy. He makes him a loud, sharp, clever and observant leader of the pack. He won’t show weakness, and he certainly won’t let people walk all over him.

Elizabeth superbly conveys the frustrations and desires of Maggie. She is all strength, anger, sensuality, desperation, sexiness, and passion. Maggie is not a woman who is content to sit at home knitting, she is clever, strong and fiercely independent. Her performance is all in her expressions and body language. I think this is one of the very best performances she ever gave.

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Maggie lets her feelings be known. Screenshot by me.

As I said earlier, Elizabeth’s performance in this film also showed off what a superb dramatic actress she could be. I just think it’s a shame that she didn’t get more meaty dramatic material like this to work with in her career. This film along with Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Woolf? and The Taming Of The Shrew are real highpoints in Elizabeth’s career I think.   

I think that in the way Elizabeth plays Maggie here, she makes her become the strongest person in that family. Maggie keeps a cool head, she knows what’s going on, and she doesn’t care one bit for custom or tradition, she will do what she decides to do. I also love how she stands by Brick, even if she doesn’t fully understand what ails him, she’ll stick by her man and won’t leave him alone.

I also love how Maggie doesn’t stand for the rubbish way Mae’s kids treat her. Those kids are rude and spoilt, and Maggie doesn’t stand for their bad behaviour.

The ice cream throwing scene is a great favourite of mine. Maggie can’t believe that this obnoxious kid has just ruined her outfit by throwing ice cream at her. Maggie soon takes matters into her own hands and dishes out some punishment. That brat was flat out asking for it and Maggie squished that ice cream right in her face! Haha! 🙂  My screenshots below show Maggie getting her ice cream revenge. 🙂

When you think of this film, I will bet that it is Elizabeth’s performance and character that comes instantly to their mind. Elizabeth makes Maggie such a strong, sexy, passionate, desperate and tender woman, who it is impossible to forget. I also like how Elizabeth shows us that despite feeling left out, lonely, and despairing; Maggie still has some hope that she and Brick can actually get back together again and find a lasting happiness.

Maggie is patient with Brick, she lets her presence be known to him, and she doesn’t let him push her away from him. She is willing to wait for him to come to her, she bides her time and waits. This situation may get her down, but she doesn’t accept that the situation can never change or get better. Maggie always has hope. Maggie is a survivor of this situation and family. In that respect I think she is quite similar to Elizabeth.  

This film is a real high point in Elizabeth’s career. She gave this role everything she had, and I really think that shows through in her performance. 

What do you think of this film? What are your thoughts on Elizabeth’s performance as Maggie?

The following are my favourite Elizabeth Taylor films.

1- Who’s Afraid Of Virginia Woolf?

2- Cat On A Hot Tin Roof

3- Little Women

4- The Taming Of The Shrew

5- Cleopatra

6- The Sandpiper

7- Elephant Walk

 

 

 

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Blogathons

Thanks For Taking Part In The Small Screen Blogathon

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A big thank you to everyone who took part in this blogathon.

You have all written some truly amazing posts about series and TV films dear to your heart.

I have really enjoyed reading your posts. I hope you all had fun. Thanks for taking part. 

 

Lon 4You are all invited to take part in my next blogathon. Ruth over at SilverScreenings and myself are co-hosting The Lon Chaney Sr Blogathon.

 

Blogathons

The Small Screen Blogathon Begins

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About a month ago I announced this Small Screen Blogathon.

Seventeen lovely people were kind enough to sign up to take part. A range of series and TV films were selected by them to be discussed today.

So without any further ado, let us all gather together around the TV. The sofa and chairs are empty, the snacks and drinks are ready, and the remote control is standing by. What series shall we gather together to watch first? 

                                                                 The Entries 

MovieMovieBlogBlog invites us all to join him to watch the British comedy classic Coupling.

 

Wolfman’s Cult Film Club has a guest appearance that he’d like us to check out on the Science Fiction series The Invaders.

 

Join Thoughts All Sorts to watch the Sci-Fi buddy series Almost Human.

 

We head to Yorkshire with Cinema Essentials, and he shows us how to be a country vet in All Creatures Great and Small. 

 

Bonnywood Manor invites us to join a series dear to his heart called Pushing Daisies.

 

Moon In Gemini takes us to that mysterious island to review an episode of Lost called The Constant.

 

Mike’s Take On The Movies changes the channel and invites us to watch two George Kennedy TV films.

 

The Midnite Drive-In shows us the episode where Mr. Monk met Country legend Willie Nelson in the Monk episode, Mr. Monk Meets The Red-Headed Stranger.

 

The Humpo Show invites us all to binge watch the boxset of The Office. 

 

Caftan Woman introduces us all to two sleuthing sisters in the criminally little known series The Snoop Sisters. 

 

Vinnieh would love us all to join him to binge watch Season 1 of Victoria.

 

Reelweegiemidgetreviews takes us back to the 80’s with Dynasty: The Making Of A Guilty Pleasure & The Cartier Affair.

 

Sparks From A Combustible Mind would love us to join her in watching the adventures of the master of the little grey cells Poirot. 

 

The Wonderful World Of Cinema invites us to watch a Canadian series that is very dear to her heart Les Filles de Caleb.

 

Whimsically Classic asks us to join for a lot of laughs watching I Love Lucy.

 

I’d love you to grab some snacks and watch the life of an Edwardian cook who was known as The Duchess Of Duke Street.

 

 

 

Blogathons, Silent Film, Tributes To Classic Stars

Announcing The Lon Chaney Sr Blogathon

Good morning to you all. Guess what? You are all invited to participate in yet another blogathon.  🙂 

This year would have been the 135th birthday of the actor Lon Chaney Sr. To mark Lon’s 135th anniversary, myself and Ruth of Silver Screenings are inviting you all to join us in celebrating Lon’s remarkable life and career.  

Lon 4We will be holding the blogathon on the 5th & 6th of May, 2018. 

If you would like to take part, you are free to write about any of Lon’s films. We will accept no more than two duplicates for his film titles though.

You can also write about his famous makeup (which he created himself). You could also write about your favourite Lon Chaney film characters. You could even write about his entire career if you would like to. 

If you have never seen a Lon Chaney Sr film before, then maybe you could use this blogathon as an opportunity to finally do so.

If you feel like writing more than one post for this blogathon you can do.

Lon Chaney was a man of many talents. Known as the man of a thousand faces, he was famous for pushing himself to physical extremes to play disabled characters. He was also famous for creating his own makeup to play disfigured characters. Chaney was quite a humble man off screen and he kept himself to himself when he wasn’t working.

Keeping himself quite private may well have helped him as an actor I think. As he didn’t go around publicising Lon Chaney the man, I think that may have helped audiences forget about the actor and helped them buy more into the characters he was playing up on the screen.

If you would like to take part in our blogathon just leave a comment with me or with Ruth. Let us know what you are going to write about, and also please leave us the name and url of your blog.  

Ruth will be hosting on the 6th, and I will be hosting on the 5th. Pick which day you want to post your entry on and leave the entry with whichever of us is hosting that day. It is more than ok for you to post your entry a few days early if you wish.

Check the participation list below to see who is writing about what. Please take one of the awesome banners that Ruth has designed. Put it up on your blog somewhere to help publicise the event. 

Have fun writing. Let’s all join together to celebrate the talents of Lon and his special approach to his work. 

 

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Participation List

Maddy Loves Her Classic Films – Lon’s portrayal of the disfigured, the disabled, and the unlucky in love. 

Silver Screenings Lon Chaney: The Man Of A Thousand Faces (2000 Documentary)

In The Good Old Days Of Classic Hollywood – The Unknown & Ace Of Hearts 

Taking Up RoomThe Hunchback Of Notre Dame

Wide Screen WorldOliver Twist

An Ode To DustChaney as the child of deaf parents

The Dream Book BlogOutside The Law

Christina WehnerHe Who Gets Slapped

Silver Screen ClassicsLondon After Midnight: The Holy Grail Of Silent Film

Caftan WomanThe Trap

Critica Retro –  A thank you letter to Lon Chaney

 

 

 

 

Blogathons, Silent Film, Tributes To Classic Stars

The Fourth Annual Buster Keaton Blogathon: Why I Love Buster

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Lea over at Silent-ology is hosting this blogathon all about Buster Keaton. Be sure to visit her site to read all the other entries. I can’t wait to read them all myself.  

When I saw that Lea was hosting this blogathon, I jumped at the chance to take part so that I could share my great love for this film legend. There are not enough words for me to use to be able to fully express my admiration and love for Buster.

Buster Keaton will have me laughing hysterically one moment. The next moment he will have me sitting on the edge of my seat in suspense and anticipation. He was a hugely talented man. I also think that he was someone who was equally at home both in front and behind the camera.

Whenever I am in need of something to prove that at one time dangerous and epic scenes were once filmed for real (hit the road CGI), then it is to Buster Keaton and his work that I turn. 

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Buster prepares to do the clothes line stunt in Neighbors. Screenshot by me.

I’ve been a fan of Buster for a few years now. I first became a fan of Buster’s due to his audacious stunt work. Long before I loved him because he made me laugh, he had me open mouthed in disbelief at what I had just witnessed him doing in terms of stunt work. He made his stunt work look effortless. He also risked real injury to create that stunt work for our viewing pleasure.

I think that anyone can end up creating a scene or sequence that will make people laugh. Very few though would be able to create something that has people laughing, gasping in shock, or has you on the edge of your seat in suspense. Buster’s sequences often leave you doing all three of those things at once!   

The risks that Buster took on screen are really what has led me to like him so much. He pushed himself to such great extremes on screen. He showed us just what extreme physical stunts could be captured on camera. He never faked the gag, or the risky stunt work that it took to achieve it.

Whether he is risking life and limb aboard a train, running from boulders, or jumping off of things, Buster is always right there at the centre of the action and danger. Seeing him in those situations makes me admire him as an actor and director. He also had the gift of making what he was doing look like it was happening in the moment and was totally natural and effortless for him.

I love what Buster does because he shows us that nothing can ever replace seeing something happen for real. Today films are so often filled to the brim with CGI, the effects usually look fake and I often find myself rolling my eyes when such effects appear on the screen. Buster showed us that nothing wows audiences more than seeing something spectacular done on screen for real. This still remains the case today one hundred years later. I feel that his work is timeless because it has a wow factor.

Where many Silent stars and films have sadly long since been forgotten about, Buster on the other hand retains a large amount of fame and influence today. His work commands the respect and admiration of audiences and filmmakers today. I think that is because of his stunt work and those incredible sequences he created for us to marvel at. He is proof that you just can’t beat doing something on screen for real.  

I also love Buster because he was a jack of all trades. He was a skilled actor, a natural comedian, a gifted director, and he was also one of the best stunt men around. He could do it all, and he had a vision for what he wanted to achieve on screen and he stuck right to it.

There are not many in the film business who were as talented as he was, or who could take on such different film roles with ease like he could.  Buster was a one of a kind and I think that is why he has become such a favourite of mine. He was multi talented and always knew how to entertain and impress his audience. He also knew that nothing impresses more than something being done for real. 

I think it’s a real shame that the talents of Charles Chaplin have so overshadowed Buster’s over the last century. Mention Silent era comedians, and I bet you anything that it is Chaplin who most people speak of. Chaplin quite rightly has been so praised and admired, but I think that Buster was every bit as skilled, funny and as worthy of praise as Chaplin was. I think he deserves to be spoken of alongside Chaplin equally. They were both comedy masters and both had such different ways of going about their job. 

Don’t get me wrong, I love Chaplin very much and I think highly of his work; I just strongly feel that Buster’s name and career deserves all the praise that Chaplin’s has received over the years. Chaplin is a name that is known even to people who have never seen a Silent film My wish is that the same can be said for Buster Keaton. I hope that more young people come to discover his films and see him for the timeless genius that he was.   

I think it’s fair to say that few people have been able to be as much of a success behind, and in front of the camera, as Buster was able to be. He really was one of the greatest filmmakers. He worked so hard, was a perfectionist, and I like that he came up with an idea and then went and found a way to make that a reality. 

Although he was not as famous on screen in his later years as he had once been, I sincerely hope that deep down inside somewhere Buster continued to know how much he was loved and respected by audiences. I think he would be very moved if he could read our discussions and see that he and his work remain so respected and loved a century later. 

Now, if you will all kindly excuse me, I have a date with Mr. Buster Keaton. There will be laughter, there will be adventure, and there will certainly be one awestruck film viewer. 

Thanks for the laughs. Thanks for the stunts. Thanks for all of those unforgettable images and scenes. Buster, you really were the best! 🙂  

If you have never seen a Buster Keaton film before I have to ask what are you waiting for? Seek his work out, and when you do, prepare to laugh and to be in awe. 

 

Blogathons, Classic TV, Drama, Romance, War

The Duchess Of Duke Street (1976-1977)

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This is my own entry for my Small Screen blogathon being held on the 20th of this month.  If you would like to join the blogathon there is still time to do so. Find more details and sign up here.

I am writing about the series The Duchess Of Duke Street

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Louisa hard at work in the kitchen. Screenshot by me.

This British series is based upon the life of a real Edwardian woman called Rosa Lewis(1867-1952). Rosa was a renowned cook and she also owned the Cavendish Hotel in London (which is still open today). Rosa was famous throughout British society for her cooking, and also for the rumour that she and Prince Edward (later King Edward V11)were having an affair. It’s not difficult to see why her story inspired this series to be made. 

John Hawkesworth (the man who helped Jean Marsh and Eileen Atkins turn Upstairs, Downstairs into the great success it became)produced The Duchess of Duke Street. Series that John were involved with were noted for their period detail, and a great many of them became huge successes.  

One of my favourite series that John was involved with is the Granada TV series The Adventures, Return and Casebook of Sherlock Holmes, which starred Jeremy Brett (in my opinion the best Sherlock Holmes ever captured on screen).

The Duchess Of Duke Street is another of John’s high quality series. I don’t simply love this one for its story and setting, I love this one because it depicts a woman trying out and succeeding in business at a time when women just didn’t do such things. Louisa Trotter is the main character of the series, and she becomes a successful cook and businesswoman. She doesn’t take no for an answer and she never gives up even when things are tough for her. 

Louisa works with men, she is in charge of men and she gains the respect and admiration of men. I find Louisa quite an inspirational character really, she is not content to stay a wife or a servant. Louisa wants more out of life, she wants to be seen as an equal to the men she works with and she achieves that. 

The series is set in London between 1900 and 1925. We follow the life of Louisa Trotter(Gemma Jones), a young cockney woman who wants to be a cook more than anything else. Working very hard she learns the art of making food. Her food is acknowledged as being superb and is very well liked by all who taste it.

As the years go on, Louisa becomes one of the best cooks in London and becomes the owner of the Bentinck Hotel. The Bentinck is more like an apartment building than a hotel, those who stay there love it and many consider it their home away from home. Louisa has a relationship with the Prince of Wales(later to become King Edward VII), throughout the series Louisa looks back on her relationship with him very fondly.

The real love of Lousia’s life though is the handsome and outgoing aristocrat Charlie Tyrrell(Christopher Cazenove). Their relationship is extremely complex, and it is their relationship that helped make this series become a real favourite of mine. Louisa and Charlie’s story really is the heart and soul of the series.

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Charlie. Screenshot by me.

Louisa and Charlie become the best of friends and later on become lovers. They both want their relationship to become something more, but they just never seem to be able to find the right moment to change the nature of the relationship.

They have a daughter together who they call Lottie(Lalla Ward). She is raised by tenants of Charlie’s on his country estate. Charlie helps Louisa run the Bentinck and also keeps a suite of rooms there. 

Louisa and Charlie are not the only focus of the series though. Louisa’s loyal staff at the hotel include the dutiful doorman Starr(John Cater),a former soldier who speaks his mind and whose best friend is his dog Fred. Merriman(John Welsh)the elderly head waiter who wouldn’t thank you for suggesting he retire. Bubbly Welsh maid Mary(Victoria Plunckett). The assistant cook, Mrs. Cochrane (Mary Healey), and the former soldier turned gambler, Major Smith-Barton(Richard Vernon). Louisa and her staff become like family and they share the good and bad times together.

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Mr. Merriman. Screenshot by me.
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Mr. Starr. Screenshot by me.
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Mary. Screenshot by me.
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The Major. Screenshot by me.

Besides the relationship between Charlie and Louisa, my favourite relationship in the series is the one between Louisa and the Major. He becomes a father figure to her and a very good friend. His confession to her at the end of the series regarding his feelings for her is one of my all time favourite scenes from the series.

 

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Louisa salutes Charlie as he leaves for the trenches. Screenshot by me.

The second half of the series focuses on the brutal and upsetting events of World War One and its aftermath. Louisa turns the hotel into a place for only British soldiers to be able stay. Charlie has to go off to fight in the war. Tragedy, pain and sorrow sadly lie in wait for our characters.

 

I also love how Gemma portrays Louisa’s unwillingness to show any sort of vulnerability, even when she’s alone with Charlie, she very seldom lets her guard down. It is like she always has to appear strong and tough. I think that she feels that way because she is afraid that to appear vulnerable would make her appear weak.

At times it has to be said that Gemma’s shrieking when things don’t go the way Louisa wants them to, does very easily grate on the viewer, but it is all a part of this character and I really like how Gemma shows us that Louisa has flaws and is not perfect. I also like that Louisa’s determination to never be vulnerable is also her weakness, because she makes life more difficult for herself due to her always hiding her inner self. Louisa is a very interesting character indeed. One of Gemma Jones’s best performances I’d say. Since this series aired, Gemma has gone on to become one of our most beloved actresses. 

Christopher Cazenove is so lovable as the fun loving and decent Charlie. I like how we see him transition from playboy, to the more mature Lord Charles, and finally to damaged soldier. Christopher is a great favourite of mine and I never understood why he never became a much bigger star. He was always a welcome presence on screen and this is one of best performances as far as I’m concerned. 

This series is a real character piece and it is filled with great characters, great performances and many memorable storylines. This series is one that really gets you caught up the characters lives and you feel for them. I love it because of that, but I also love it for its depiction of Edwardian life.

I also find the food preparation sequences fascinating. There were some dishes that Louisa prepared that I had never heard of before and they look delicious. I also love how much effort she put into making her meals. It’s also fascinating to me to see how much of an event evening meals were back then, they were almost ritualistic (different cutlery for different dishes, what can be served at what time)and I love the fancy table decorations and food presentations.

Watching series like this really lets you see just what has changed in life. I for one have never seen a dinner table like some of the ones we see in this. I’ve never seen food displayed in such beautiful ways either (even when going out to eat at restaurants) it goes to show that we may have progressed in some ways, but I think we’ve gone back a step or two in terms of food and food presentation. 

If you have seen this series what did you think of it?

Check back on Tuesday for news of the next blogathon I’m hosting. I know, I’m totally addicted to blogathons. 🙂

 

 

 

Blogathons, Disaster, Drama, Romance

The Clark Gable Blogathon: San Francisco (1936)

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Michaela over at Love Letters To Old Hollywood is hosting this blogathon all about Clark Gable. Be sure to visit her site to read all the other entries. I can’t wait to read them all myself.

I think it’s fair to say that Clark Gable was the leading man in 1930’s Hollywood. Strong, handsome, and very charming; Clark could fit right into pretty much any film genre. He also had that whole rugged, tough guy on the outside, who is really just a total sweetheart on the inside act down perfectly as his screen persona. 

I think that Clark Gable’s appeal as an actor lay in the fact that he appealed equally to both men and women. Men wanted to be like Clark, while the women all wanted to be with him. If a film starring Clark was released there would be a lot of people turning up at cinemas to watch it.

Long before watching him in his most famous role, that of the dashing Captain Rhett Butler in Gone With the Wind, I first saw Clark in a much lesser known film. That film is the 1936 disaster drama, San Francisco.    

This film was one of the first from the classic era that I ever watched. I loved every single minute of it.  I found the songs to be moving and powerful, the romance to be sweet, and I felt that the friendship between Clark’s rogue and Spencer Tracy’s kindly priest came across as real and strong. I loved the beautiful gowns Jeanette got to wear. I was extremely impressed with the earthquake sequences. This one quickly became one of my favourite films. 

I think it’s a shame that hardly anyone seems to know this film nowadays. It is a terrific character piece, has some strong performances and features some memorable songs. It also shows us the San Francisco of the past, the one that was lost forever in the 1906 earthquake (that famous quake plays a key role in the film).

I love Clark quite a bit in this film. I really like the mixed way of how he plays his character. At times his character, Blackie Norton, can be a mean and harsh man; yet at other times Blackie is gentle and loveable. Clark really shows us that although Blackie is certainly flawed, he certainly isn’t all bad and he really does have a great deal of good within him. Clark plays him in such a way that we can forgive him any bad he does, simply because Clark makes him so likeable.  

I also like how Clark conveys Blackie’s growing feelings for Mary to us with expressions alone. We feel his desire to be with this woman, but also that he is not able to change his ways to commit to her. We feel his distress when he doesn’t know if she has survived the quake, and we see how torn up he is thinking he may have lost her. Clark really goes through a wide range of emotions in this film and his performance really brings his character to life and gives him depth. I think this is one of the best performances he ever gave.

The film begins on the 31st of December, 1905. It’s New Year Eve and the party atmosphere is in full swing throughout the city. Aspiring singer Mary Blake (Jeanette MacDonald)arrives in the big city that very evening. Mary is desperate to find work. She is hired by nightclub owner Blackie Norton (Clark Gable)to be one of the singers at his club.

Although she can sing in the upbeat way that his club requires, it is clear that Mary’s voice is much better suited to the opera stage. Mary’s voice really is out of this world and it’s very clear that she has it in her to go far with her singing talent. 

Blackie and Mary fall in love, but it’s clear to us that Blackie doesn’t quite know how to handle his growing feelings. Blackie says and does things that push Mary away from him. Mary is a very pure and religious woman and she doesn’t want to be just a casual fling to Blackie. Mary also struggles in adjusting to her new life in San Francisco.

Blackie is a loveable rogue, and he is also quite the ladies man too. Blackie has a lot of casual relationships with women who work with him, and also with women he knows socially; he treats his women very well and they like him, but he never actually commits to any of them. 

Blackie has a tough and somewhat selfish exterior. His best friend Father Tim Mullin(Spencer Tracy)knows the truth of the matter. He knows that Blackie is in actuality a really nice guy, a good guy, and that he is very decent. Blackie is not religious, but he always helps Tim out when the church needs money, and he will do anything for anyone in need. Tim and Blackie have been friends since childhood and know each other inside out. The pair lead different lives now but they are still a part of each others lives despite their major differences. 

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Mary becomes a star attraction at Blackie’s club and attracts the notice of  the wealthy Jack Burly (Jack Holt)who offers her the job of singer at the Tivoli Opera House in the city. Mary and Jack become involved which then leads to Blackie getting angry and leaves us wondering which man she will choose in the end. 

In the early hours of the 18th of January, 1906, an earthquake strikes the city and then everything changes. Lives are lost, homes and businesses are destroyed, and the city itself is destroyed. In just one night an entire way of life is wiped out forever. Our characters are caught up in this and it has a huge impact on them. The earthquake also serves as a wake up call to Blackie, he learns that love and relationships are more important than work, or putting up a tough guy image as protection in life.

The earthquake sequence is the highlight of the film and it is so realistic. It perfectly captures the horror, the confusion, the panic, and the terror of an earthquake. It’s a scary and distressing sequence and I think it stands up very well when viewed today. It’s a very impressive sequence and all the actors (both stars and extras)do a superb job of portraying their fear and confusion. This sequence is that good, that it’s almost like someone filmed the real quake and what we see in the film is documentary footage. I’d say the film is worth watching for this sequence alone.

The human drama is just as memorable as the quake sequence and the actors all do a good job of keeping our interest throughout. Clark is excellent in the role of Blackie, and he makes Blackie a very believable character who has strengths, weaknesses and also flaws. He isn’t perfect and he tries to change his ways. I really like how Clark shows Blackie as being more vulnerable as the film goes on. He is especially excellent towards the end of the film set during the earthquake.

If you are not a fan of Jeanette or her singing, then I think you might struggle to watch many of the scenes in the film. There are many scenes of her singing, but if you do like her and you like opera this will be a real treat.

I’m not the biggest fan of Jeanette, but I do like her and I consider this to be one of her best films. I like how she lets us see this woman is really struggling against her growing feelings for Blackie, and also shows her struggling against her principles and morals in her love for him. Jeanette’s performance is also one that is all in the expressions, her face conveys to us what her character is going through.

Spencer Tracy is excellent in the role of the decent, loyal best friend and the kind and caring priest. Spencer oozes goodness and compassion in this film. He makes you wish that you had a friend like Father Tim in your life. This performance could also be seen as warm up for his famous performances as a kind priest, in Boy’s Town and Men Of Boy’s Town.

If there is a downside to the film, I’d say it perhaps lies in focusing too much on the singing career of Mary. If you’re not a fan of opera then these sequences will no doubt be difficult to get through. I would have liked to have seen a few more scenes between Tim and Blackie. I would also liked to have seen more of the aftermath of the quake to see what the survivors did next. 

My favourite scenes are the following. Father Tim ringing Blackie to thank him for the organ. Blackie and Mary’s first meeting and him letting her stay the night in his apartment. Blackie falling to his knees and praying (Clark’s performance in this moment never fails to me to tears). Blackie punching Tim. Mary singing with choir at the church. Father Tim’s conversation with Mary in the church. The entire earthquake sequence and final scenes of the film.

Singin’ In The Rain fans need to listen out closely to Jeanette’s singing scenes, as at one point she can be heard singing the song Would You. This song  of course became famous for its use in that 1952 musical.

The other memorable tune in this is the very catchy song San Francisco. This one has stayed with me since the first time I ever watched this. I just love the way that Jeanette sings it, and I think it is a bouncy and uplifting tune.

There are also many religious overtones to be found throughout this film. If you view the film from that perspective, I suppose that the earthquake at the end could be seen to almost serve as a force sent to wipe away the perceived decadence and possibly immoral lifestyle of one San Francisco, and allowing for a new and fresh city and better life to be built in its place.

Some viewers take issue with the end of the film where everyone, even people who don’t believe in god, are seen at the end to be praying to god. I myself find this to be something of a leap. I doubt a traumatic event like this would have any non believers turning religious.

Having said that though, I do think that in a terrible event such as an earthquake, people who are not religious, and who do survive, will beg out for their loved ones lives to be spared also. They probably will say a thank you for surviving. They might not say these words to a god, they may just think them in their head, or they may say them out loud to no one in particular.  

In my opinion this is one of the best American films of the 1930’s. I think that it has a bit of everything in it for people to be able to enjoy. The film has some romance and drama, there are tears, good visual effects and also some very impressive stunts too. There are some stunning costumes in this too, I really envy Jeanette for having been able to wear such gorgeous dresses. 

Clark Gable really is at his best here and I think that he got to show us what dramatic acting heights he could reach. 

My five favourite Clark Gable films are the following.

1- It Happened One Night

2- San Francisco

3- Gone With The Wind

4- Teacher’s Pet

5- Red Dust

Any other fans of San Francisco? What do you think of Gable’s performance?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blogathons, Coming Of Age, Drama

The Robin Williams Blogathon: Dead Poets Society (1989)

Robin blogathon

Crystal over at In The Good Old Days Of Classic Hollywood, and Gill over at Realweegiemidget Reviews are co-hosting this blogathon all about Robin Williams. Be sure to visit their sites to read all the entries. I can’t wait to read them myself.  

Robin Williams could always make me laugh. Whether I was watching him doing stand up routines on stage. Whether I was watching him in films like Good Morning Vietnam or Aladdin. Whatever he was doing, one thing was always for sure, I could always guarantee that I would be on the floor laughing at Robin’s antics. 

I love how sharp and quick he was as a comic, within seconds he could improvise something and literally go down a whole new route and he would have you laughing so hard that tears would fall. I miss him so much. Thankfully he left a legacy of comedy behind for us to enjoy forever. 

I also really enjoy seeing him get to show off his dramatic acting talents. In films like Good Will Hunting and One Hour Photo, Robin impresses me greatly, and he shows just what a good dramatic actor he could be. I want to talk about my favourite film role of Robin’s. That film is Dead Poets Society. The character he plays in this is called Mr. Keating. 

This is a film about conformity, individuality, and choice. It’s set in 1959. This was a time when girls were encouraged to get married instead of pursuing a career. Many boys were expected to follow in the footsteps of their father and grandfather and join whatever profession they worked in, whether they wanted to do this or not. There were literally generations of men not being able to connect to their kids because their dad hadn’t been able to connect with them, and they therefore didn’t know how to express their feelings to their own children very well.

This film looks at all of these things, and it also shows us how deeply unhappy so many young men at this time were because they were not usually allowed to follow their own paths. 

At school at this time the teachers disciplined the students in their care. They expected facts and figures to be learnt by heart, and the vast majority of these teachers didn’t inspire students. Nor did they really make their classes ones which were desired to be attended. Despite all of that though it has to be said that students were much better behaved back then, and there were also very high standards expected to be followed in schools and in the content of school work which was handed in. So there were good and bad parts to this rigid, and far more traditional era. I’m sure there were also some teachers who were well liked and didn’t teach in that same uninspiring way, but they were few and far between. 

Mr. Keating is a man who breaks that teaching tradition. He becomes a friend to the pupils who he teaches. He treats them as individuals. He makes them want to come to his lessons because he makes them interesting and fun. He teaches the boys to think for themselves. He also makes them realise that life itself is way more important than memorising mathematic equations, or remembering facts from history. Life is about living. If you go through life dead inside, trapped in a job or role you take no joy in, then you might as well be dead. 

Whilst Robin does get some funny moments in this film, I think that his performance and role here is much more serious than people were really used to at this point in his career. Robin does such a good job of conveying how passionate his character is about teaching, and also how much he wants to inspire his students to think bigger and to be themselves.  

Robin also conveys a sadness and a weariness to us about Keating. We see that Keating knows that the reality is many of these students may well just end up unhappy and unfulfilled despite his efforts. He feels for them deeply and we see his pity for them. Robin does such a good job of showing this on his face. Watch him closely and you will see such a lot going on behind his eyes throughout this film.    

 

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While Keating and the message he conveys are largely positive, there are those in the school who see him as a danger and want him gone. Also just like in The Prime Of Miss Jean Brodie, Keating’s influence and inspiration ends up leading to tragedy and pain. He and the individuality that he represents are scapegoated and blamed for this.  

I don’t think this is fair or justified. In reality it is the father of the boy at the centre of the tragedy who is to blame for what happens. He wouldn’t listen to his son, he wouldn’t try to understand his desires, and he failed to see how desperate and unhappy he was. This boy had also shown signs of depression and despair long before he even met Keating. Keating’s words merely made him realise just how trapped he was in his life.

The boy does what he does in the end because he is taking control of his situation, and because he also knows that his father (and the traditional society he represents) will never stop trying to control him. He can’t stand that thought, and so he takes his own life to escape that continued unhappiness. Nobody wants to accept that fact though, and so the idealistic teacher is blamed.

We later see that Keating’s lessons will never be forgotten by the boys he has taught. We are left with a sense of hope that they will be able to find their own path in life and stick to it and be happy. Keating can carry that final sight in his heart and mind forever. He knows that he has reached these young men and they have taken his messages and teachings to heart.  

The film is directed by Peter Weir. He is one of my favourite directors and I really like how many of his films often focus on a group of people closed off from the world most of us know. He showed us a girls boarding school in Picnic At Hanging Rock. An Amish community in Witness. A boys boarding school in Dead Poets Society. A naval ship in Master and Commander: The Far Side Of The World. 

I like Weir because he lets the actors and the characters tell his stories. He doesn’t rely on effects to keep your interest. He lets the time and place in which his film is set wash over you and draw you in. It’s like you are transported into the world he is showing you. This film is one of his very best. 

The film is set in America in 1959. Welton Academy is a prestigious boys school. It is seen as a great privilege to get a place there. Todd Anderson (Ethan Hawke)is a new student here and is both nervous and uncertain about his future here. He is a shy and introverted boy and has the shadow of his accomplished older brother (a former pupil) hanging over him.

Todd is befriended by Neil Perry (Robert Sean Leonard), a seemingly outgoing and fun boy who is Todd’s roommate. Neil actually harbours a deep sadness and pain. Neil helps Todd become a little less introverted. 

Mr.Keating (Robin Williams)is a former pupil of the school who has returned here to take up the position of English teacher.  His teaching methods soon attract the criticism of the headteacher, Mr. Nolan (Norman Lloyd). The pupils meanwhile love his lessons and his fresh teaching style. Neil Perry takes Keating’s words about seizing the day very much to heart. Neil is ignored by his over bearing father and is being pressured into a career he has no wish to have. Neil longs to be an actor, but he sadly is all too aware that this just won’t be a possible career choice for him to pursue. 

Neil, Todd, Charlie Dalton (Gale Hansen), Knox Overstreet(Josh Charles), Gerard Pitts(James Waterston), Steven Meeks (Allelon Ruggiero) and Richard Cameron(Dylan Kussman)are the group of friends who are influenced by Keaton the most. This group start up a secret club called The Dead Poets Society. This club was originally something Keating belonged to during his time as a student. In the club they can discuss poetry, tell stories, share laughter, and generally have a good time away from the restraints of the school. 

Ethan Hawke, Robert Sean Leonard and Josh Charles would go on to become pretty big names in film and TV. The other kids never seemed to reach the same level of fame sadly. Gale Hansen is the standout of the film for me. Hansen plays the rebellious class clown, Charlie Dalton; he is already something of a free thinker already but he really takes it to the next level once Keating enters his life. 

Norman Lloyd is excellent as the strict and cold headmaster (Norman is still with us now aged 103!).

Kurtwood Smith delivers a solid performance as Neil’s dad, he loves his son, but he doesn’t know how to talk to him and he won’t let him follow his dreams (more than likely because that is what happened between him and his own dad).

Robin Williams brings warmth and life to Keating and he makes him a teacher who we all long to have in our lives. 

I have to give a shoutout to the utterly gorgeous photography by John Seale. I also can’t praise the beautiful score by Maurice Jarre highly enough, it is atmospheric and haunting. I think this is one of his best ever scores, it stays in my mind long after the film has finished. 

My favourite scenes are the following. Charlie taking a phone call from God.Keating showing the students the photos of former students who are now long since dead. Keating finally getting Todd to be able to recite a poem. Neil and Keating talking about how Neil feels trapped. The students standing at the end for Keating. The scene between Todd and Neil discussing Todd’s birthday present. The first assembly of the new term . Todd out in the snow learning about Neil. All of the Dead Poet Society meetings in the cave. 

What do you think of this film and Robin’s performance?

 

 

 

 

Blogathons, Classic TV

Announcing The Small Screen Blogathon 20th February, 2018

I’d like to invite you all to join my latest blogathon. We all love films on these blogs. However, for this particular blogathon I’d love for us to celebrate the treasures found over on the small screen.

For this blogathon you can write about miniseries, long running series, soaps, classic TV, modern TV and TV films. You can write about your favourite episodes from a particular series, or write about the series as a whole. You can write about series from any country, genre, and era. You can write about more than one series if you wish to do so.

I will allow two duplicates per title, but as there are so many series out there I’m really hoping people don’t all go for obvious titles like The Twilight Zone or Friends. If the series you would like to discuss as a whole has been taken, you can still write about your favourite episode, or episodes from that particular series. 

I’m holding this one as a one day event. It will run on the 20th of February. Please leave me the links to your posts on that day or before. I will then link everyone’s posts together on the 20th. 

Take one of the banners below and pop it on your site somewhere.  Check the participation list below to see who is writing about what. Have fun! I can’t wait to read your entries.  

 

  Participation List

Maddylovesherclassicfilms – The Duchess Of Duke Street

The Humpo ShowThe Office (US version)

MovieMovieBlogBlogCoupling

SparksfromacombustiblemindPoirot & Miss Marple

Bonnywood ManorPushing Daisies

The Midnite Drive-InMr. Monk and the Red Headed Stranger (episode of Monk)

ThoughtsallsortsOnly Human

Whimsically ClassicI Love Lucy & The Brady Bunch

Vinnieh Victoria

Mike’sTakeOnTheMoviesA Cry In The Wilderness & Deliver Us From Evil (two George Kennedy TV films)

Caftan WomanThe Snoop Sisters 

Wolfman’sCultFilmClubThe Invaders

dbmoviesblogThe Handmaid’s Tale

RealweegiemidgetreviewsDynasty – the making of a guilty pleasure (2005, TV film) & The Cartier Affair (1984)

Moon In Gemini – The Constant (episode of the TV series Lost)

In The Good Old Days Of Classic HollywoodThe Victim (1972, TV film)

The Wonderful World Of CinemaLes Filles de Caleb 

Cinema EssentialsAll Creatures Great and Small

 

Small screen blogathon 1

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Blogathons, Tributes To Classic Stars

The Bill & Myrna New Year’s Blogathon: Why I Adore This Couple

Bill and myrna blogathon

Phyllis Loves Classic Movies and Emily at The Flapper Dame are hosting this blogathon all about William Powell and Myrna Loy. Be sure to visit their sites to read all the entries. I can’t wait to read them all myself.  

I’ve decided to write a piece about why William Powell and Myrna Loy are my favourite screen couple. I’m also going to write about a few of my favourite scenes which feature them together in some of the films they made. 

Elegance, effortless, funny, and warm are just a few of the words that instantly spring into my mind whenever I hear the names Myrna Loy and William Powell. 

Whether they are playing the loveable, and oh so elegant, Nick and Nora Charles in the Thin Man series, or whether they are playing very different characters in other films; William Powell and Myrna Loy always end up making the perfect on screen couple.

They bring life and a great deal of warmth to their characters. I think the qualities that they bring to their characters are really what makes me like them both so much.

This screen duo are my favourite classic era screen couple. Why do I love them so much? Well, sit back, and let me tell you why. 

My main reason for loving them both so much is because they had such incredible chemistry with one another. When Powell and Loy look into each others eyes, you can see the love, the affection, and the passion that their characters had going on for one another.

They make you really believe that their characters are completely in love with one another, and also that they really cared deeply about one another.  Chemistry like that can’t be faked, you either have it or you don’t, it’s that simple. These two sure had chemistry.

I also really like how they don’t outshine one another on screen. They both get their chance to shine equally in the films they made together. They are a true screen team, and they work together perfectly. I can think of no one else in the roles of Nick and Nora in The Thin Man, other than these two. They are the perfect screen duo in those films, and they play these characters in a way that I just can’t imagine other actors having been able to do. 

I also admire Powell and Loy because they had such perfect comic timing. They made everything they did on screen appear natural and effortless. They were also both very adept at both physical and verbal comedy. Their comedy skills certainly came in handy in their most famous film collaborations that of The Thin Man film series.

I also love them because seeing their double act always makes me smile. They are a film duo who I just can’t help but be cheered up by. I also consider them to be a huge source of comfort during times of illness or sadness. I say that because seeing them together in films always manages to get me to smile.

In the Thin Man films they brought their characters to life so well. They made us feel the incredibly strong bond of love and friendship that Nick and Nora had. I especially like how they convey this through their facial expressions, and also through the look in their eyes. They make us see that these two had such strong trust and belief in one another.

Powell and Loy made us realise that Nick and Nora would never cheat on one another, that they had a great deal of fun together, that they loved and desired one another, and most important of all that one could never live happily without the other.

I also like how Nick and Nora are not just lovers, but they are also soulmates and friends. They have fun together and want to be a part of the others life. If only all romantic relationships could be like theirs.

                            Here are a few of my favourite Powell and Loy film scenes.

From The Thin Man (1934)

1- Where they both look at each other and wrinkle up their faces and noses. This scene is both funny and sweet because any other woman who walked in on her husband holding another woman would most likely freak out. These two on the other hand both know it’s totally harmless, and they have a bit of a joke about it. Love the way they both do the wrinkled face look. 🙂 Adorable and so very funny.

2- The very funny and sweet scene where they discuss their Christmas presents. Powell is hysterical in the way he plays Nick in this scene. I especially love the bit where he is playing target practice with the new gun Nora brought him.

I love how the look on Loy’s face when she looks over at Powell in this scene; it’s like Nora is looking at Nick with an expression that seems as though she is thinking “oh, here we go again. The boy just has to play with the toy”. Cracks me up every time.

I also love that Nora is really loving the fur coat that Nick bought her, and she refuses to take it off, even though their apartment is really warm. I love how they are both just living in the moment, and are very happy with one another, and really admiring their new presents. 

Bill and Myrna 2

After The Thin Man (1936)

I love the scene where Nick finally realises that Nora is pregnant. I just love how Powell plays this scene. He goes from being happy and relieved that they are finally alone and together again. He says “I don’t need anything in the world except you. And a toothbrush.” Aww!

Then he sees that little baby sock that Nora is knitting. He looks up at her beaming face and finally realises what’s going on.

The way they look at each then with such love and happiness, and then how they lean in and kiss gets me every time. I love how content and happy Loy makes Nora in this scene, she is positively beaming with joy and looks radiant. This is the most adorable scene ever!  🙂 They both melt my heart in this scene.  

 Libeled Lady (1936)

The scene in the garden where she asks him if he has been proposed to much. I love it because it is a role reversal with the woman asking the man to marry her. I also love it because of how sweet Powell and Loy are in this scene. I love how depressed and anxious she is at first, and he notices this and asks her what’s wrong. Then the mood soon changes, and it is so sweet and uplifting when they both look at each other and see how much they love one another. Love it when he accepts her and they lean in and kiss. 

Well, they were just a few of my favourite Powell and Loy moments. What are some of your favourites? Please share them below. 

To sum up then, Powell and Loy always come across to me on screen as being a real married couple. Their affection for one another was the real thing and I think that it really shows on screen. They were pure movie magic. I for one will never get tired of watching them. 

Happy New Year all. Please raise a glass of champagne with me, not only to see in 2018, but to also toast the talents of William Powell and Myrna Loy!

Thank you both for all the joy you have brought to so many classic film fans. Thank you for your perfect timing, and thanks for your beautiful chemistry. Thanks for the laughter and for the romance.

R.I.P to you both. You are both greatly missed.  x