Uncategorized

Check Out#CleanMovieMonth Over At Pure Entertainment Preservation Society

Check out this classic film event being held over at Pure Entertainment Preservation Society blog. Pop over and check out this very informative site, which is a must read if you are interested in the Hollywood Production Code. 

 

 

Announcing #CleanMovieMonth! PEPS is officially announcing that July is #CleanMovieMonth! Many months are dedicated to celebrating history or bringing awareness. #CleanMovieMonth is dedicated to both. It’s a month-long celebration of Code films, specifically cinema sealed during the Breen era (1934-1954). Frequent PEPS readers know that PEPS is always dedicated to Breen era films. However, during […]

via July is #CleanMovieMonth! — pure entertainment preservation society

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Uncategorized

The Greatest Audrey Hepburn Performances

I am a big fan of Audrey Hepburn. I have often thought about which of Audrey’s film performances should be considered to be her best work. After thinking about this for quite some time, I have finally chosen a few performances that I think are her best.

I would love to get your views on Audrey’s performances in these films. 

 

The Nun’s Story (1959)

Audrey stars as a nun called Sister Luke. This film is a biopic of a real life woman who became a nun and worked out in the Congo. Audrey is beyond amazing in this film. There are scenes in this where you really do believe that she is on the point of having a breakdown. You really feel that Audrey’s character is struggling emotionally and that she has conflicted feelings about the life she has chosen to lead.

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Audrey as Sister Luke. Screenshot by me.

She perfectly conveys the emotional and physical struggle this woman endures as she overworks herself, becomes physically ill and tries to adhere to the strict rules of convent life.

I’m not the biggest fan of the Academy Awards, but I think that Audrey deserved an award for her performance in this. You can read my full review of this film here.

This is a film that doesn’t get discussed often enough, and it really should be much better known because Audrey is phenomenal in it. 

 

 

 Roman Holiday (1953)

Audrey delivers one of the most natural and remarkable debut lead film performances in film history. She totally convinces as the reserved and unhappy Princess. She also convinces as the carefree, happy, curious and adorable woman enjoying a welcome taste of real life. 

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Audrey as Princess Ann. Screenshot by me.

I love how she easily switches between innocence, intense happiness, deep sadness and being torn between her duties and her desires. It really is a poignant and powerful performance. It is easy to see how she managed to capture the public’s hearts when this one was released. 

 

 

Breakfast At Tiffany’s (1961)

Audrey wasn’t the actress who was initially the first choice for the role of Holly but defying expectations, she more than proved that she was indeed the right choice for the role. Audrey perfectly captures the various emotions and quirks of Holly so well. One moment she is happy and quirky, the next she is vulnerable and melancholy, and the next she is daring, sexy, passionate, mean and strong. 

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Audrey as Holly. Screenshot by me.

I like how Audrey makes you feel for Holly and enjoy spending time with her. Holly is such a unique character and Audrey captures her many different facets so well. You can tell when you watch this that Audrey put so much effort into this role. It is so difficult to imagine any other actress in this role now other than Audrey. It isn’t difficult to see why this has become her iconic role and film.

 

My Fair Lady (1964)

Although she doesn’t really convince as a cockney flower girl living in poverty, Audrey certainly does convince as an awkward and nervous woman who transforms into a society lady.

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Audrey as Eliza. Screenshot by me.

Audrey always had a natural class and dignity about her that aided her in her performance here. She also does such a good job of conveying Eliza’s despair, frustration and anger over her dismissal by Higgins after the ball. She makes you feel how much hard work and effort Eliza has put in, and also feel how hurt and used she feels by Higgins dismissal of her success. 

Overlooked at the time by the Academy, her performance speaks for itself and it remains moving and memorable today. You can read my full review of the film here. 

Some other fine performances include Wait Until Dark, Sabrina, CharadeThe Children’s Hour, Two For The Road and Robin and Marian. 

Which performances do you consider to be Audrey’s greatest screen work?

Uncategorized

The Second Annual Alfred Hitchcock Blogathon Concludes

Hitchcock blogathon 2018 1

Sadly our time spent with the master of suspense has drawn to a close. I want to say a huge thank you to you all for taking part. Your articles and reviews were all interesting and a lot of fun to read. I really appreciate so many people taking part. It has been so much fun.

My apologies to those of you with none WordPress blogs, I have been having trouble for a long time now leaving comments on none WordPress sites. If these sites have their comments section set to accept name and URL I have found I can comment, but I have trouble commenting when signed in directly from WordPress. I have replied to your messages letting me know you’ve posted, and I have shared my thoughts on your entries that way. 

You can find all of the terrific entries right here

If things are well with me next year, I will certainly try my best to host this for a third year running. I do hope you will all be able to join me again for another celebration of all things Hitch. 

You are all invited to take part in my next blogathon(I know, I’m addicted to blogathons 🙂 )being held in two weeks time. It is a celebration of the films of director David Lean. You can learn more and sign up here

Thanks again.

Uncategorized

The Second Annual Alfred Hitchcock Blogathon Begins

Hitchcock Blogathon 3

The Second Annual Alfred Hitchcock Blogathon has finally arrived!

Over the next two days, a large number of truly wonderful bloggers will be submitting their articles on all things Hitch.  Check back to this post today and tomorrow, I will be updating it as regularly as I can linking to all of the entries.

I can’t wait to read all of your posts. Thank you so much for taking part.

The Second Annual Alfred Hitchcock Blogathon participants gather together in the hotel lounge. The strains of Bernard Herrmann’s music can be heard floating through the air.

Someone informs us that lunch is now ready. We tuck into a delicious buffet, this is laid out for us all on top of a suspicious looking chest belonging to some guy called Brandon.

Hitchcock blogathon 4 

Day 2 Entries

The Wonderful World Of Cinema goes out to sea in order to discuss Hitchcock’s ocean set thriller Lifeboat

 

Poppity flees from crop dusters as she reviews the Hitchcock classic North By Northwest.

 

Silver Screen Classics goes on a journey with Richard Hannay to uncover the mystery of The 39 Steps.

 

Vinnieh tells us what happened when Uncle Charlie came to town in Shadow Of A Doubt.

 

Taking Up Room discusses an early film which would later become the only Hitch film that the director ever remade The Man Who Knew Too Much

 

Cracked Rear Viewer discusses the suspenseful 3D Hitchcock film Dial M For Murder.

 

Sat In Your Lap discusses the powerful Hitchcock film The Wrong Man

 

Pure Entertainment Preservation Society discusses the haunting and suspenseful film Rebecca

 

Retro Movie Buff encounters spies and windmills in her review of Foreign Correspondent.

 

 

Day 1 Entries

Down These Mean Streets spent some time with Devlin, Alicia and Alexander, and she writes about that experience in her review of Notorious

 

Cinema Essentials discusses Hitchcock’s suspenseful 3D film Dial M For Murder.

 

The Midnite-Drive In discusses the terrifying 60’s shocker Psycho and also the biopic Hitchcock. 

 

Wolffian Classics Movies Digest joins Jimmy Stewart and Grace Kelly to look out at the Rear Window

 

Realweegiemidgetreviews discusses Four O’ Clock, a Hitchcock directed episode of the TV series Suspicion.

 

Silver Screenings joins a party hiding a grisly secret in Rope.   

 

Bonnywood Manor gets caught up in the thrilling spy story Topaz.

 

Caftan Woman invites us all to join her at the theatre to discuss Stage Fright.

 

The Stop Button takes a look at one of Hitchcock’s early British films Young And Innocent.

 

dbmoviesblog takes a trip to Bodega Bay and witnesses nature striking back in The Birds.

 

Taking Up Room tells us all about Hitchcock’s first ever sound film Blackmail.

 

Cary Grant Won’t Eat You talks about the disappointing Hitchcock film Torn Curtain.

 

Sparks From A Combustible Mind discusses the time when Hitchcock went comic in The Trouble With Harry.

 

I take a trip to Manderley to meet Rebecca.  I also write about the 60th anniversary of the release of  Vertigo

Uncategorized

Announcing The Joseph Cotten Blogathon

Crystal from In the Good Old Days Of Classic Movies has asked me to co-host this blogathon with her. I was delighted to accept her invitation to be co-host. I really hope that you will all be able to join us both as we celebrate the life and career of the hugely talented classic film era actor, Joseph Cotten.

For this blogathon you can write about any of Joseph’s films. You can write about him as an actor. You can write about your favourite Joseph Cotten performances and screen characters. You can write more than one entry if you want to.

We will be accepting two duplicates per screen title, but no more than this as he made so many films, so there is lots for you to choose from.

The blogathon will be held on the  5th, 6th and 7th of September, 2018. There will also be a wrap up post held on the 8th. We picked these dates because September 5th marks the 77th anniversary of the release of Citizen Kane, which is one of Joseph’s most famous films.

I will be hosting on the 5th, and Crystal will be hosting on the 6th and 7th. Let one or both of us know what you would like to write about. 

Please check the particiaption list below to see who is writing about what. Please take one of the banners and pop it on your site somewhere to help to promote the event.

Participation List

In The Good Old Days Of Classic Hollywood: Portrait Of Jennie

Maddy Loves Her Classic Films: My three favourite Joseph Cotten performances

Lifesdailylessonsblog: The Killer Is Loose

Love Letters To Old Hollywood: Love Letters

Cinematic Scribblings: Lo Scopone Scientifico 

Caftan Woman: Walk Softly Stranger

Are You Thrilled: Niagara

Realweegiemidgetreviews:  The Case Is Closed (episode of The Rockford Files)

The Wonderful World Of Cinema: An ABC Of Joseph Cotten

Musings Of A Classic Film Addict: Lydia

Down These Mean Streets: The Third Man

Taking Up Room: Citizen Kane and Joseph and the Mercury Theatre

Anybody Got A Match?: Shadow Of A Doubt

The Midnite Drive-In: The Hearse

The Dream Book Blog: A Delicate Balance

Popcorn and Flickers: Too Much Johnson

Dubism: Tora, Tora, Tora: The Attack On Pearl Harbor

The Stop Button: Gaslight

Karavansara: Journey Into Fear

Wide Screen World: The Farmer’s Daughter

I Found It At The Movies: Topic to be decided

A Shroud Of Thoughts: Shadow Of A Doubt

MovieRobBlueprint For Murder, The Oscar and Soylent Green

Mike’s Take On The Movies: Two Flags West

Back To Golden Days: Since You Went Away

Critica Retro: I’ll Be Seeing You

Old Hollywood Films: Duel In The Sun

Moon In Gemini: The Steel Trap

Blogie and Bacall: Joseph Cotten as an actor

Poppity: Under Capricorn

 

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Joseph 3

Joseph 3

 

Uncategorized

My Small Personal Connection To Classic Films

Something a little different today. I have a small personal link to classic film that I’d like to share with you all. It’s kind of a six degrees of separation thing.

I have a very dear friend called Mike. He knows of and shares my great love for all things classic film related. He recently spoke to me about his own family link to classic era films. I thought I’d share with you all what he told me, because I think that it happens to be pretty awesome. 🙂

Mike’s dad’s cousin was married to Tony Sforzini. Now you may well be asking yourselves right now, who on earth is Tony Sforzini?  Allow me to tell you who he was. Tony was a make-up artist and was also a make-up supervisor, and he worked on a large number of British classic era films. He worked on films from the early 1940’s until the mid 1970’s.

Tony worked quite often on the British films of the actor and director Laurence Olivier. Mike doesn’t know if they were friends or just colleagues, but what is certain is that Tony did work on a large number of Olivier’s films over the years including Hamlet, Henry V, The Prince and the Showgirl and The Entertainer

I know that some actors and directors like to work with the same crew a lot, so maybe Laurence Olivier loved his work and kept on requesting that Tony work with him.

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A photo that Mike sent to me. This shows Tony applying some make-up to the actor Michael Redgrave. This could be for the film Shake Hands With The Devil, in which Michael Redgrave starred.

When he was younger, Mike visited Tony at work over in Ireland, this visit was to the set of the film Shake Hands With The Devil (1959). On the set Mike watched Tony work his make-up magic, and if that wasn’t exciting enough, Mike also got to meet James Cagney! (you can imagine how envious I was when he told me this) James was there because he was the main star of this film. 

Mike was aware of who James Cagney was, but he wasn’t really aware at that age of just how big a star this man actually was. Mike told me that James spoke to him and that he was very friendly. Mike said that if he had been a bit older at the time he met James then he would have most likely asked him lots of questions, and he would have tried to talk to him for a bit longer than he actually did.   

Mike shared with me the following recollections of his visit to the set. 

“The film was Shake Hands with the Devil and on the day that I was there, apart from James Cagney, there was a scene being filmed with Christopher Rhodes questioning Don Murray who was supposed to be lying on a prison bed (it was actually a camera man rolling around as he was being punched).
 
The only ‘stars’ I saw apart from James Cagney who did a scene where he breaks into the prison to rescue Don Murray, were Don Murray and Donal Donnelly.
 
They were talking as Don Murray was being made up to look as though his character had been beaten up by the British. There may have been other actors in the studio on the day, but I didn’t recognise them. The only other thing I remember is that co-star Glynis Johns dressing room was full of Teddy Bears.”

So that is my small link to classic films. I just wanted to share this with you. Hopefully this post will also help to raise awareness of Tony Sforzini. Keep an eye out for his name in the credits the next time you watch a classic era British film!

Do you have a personal connection to classic film? Share your story. 

Uncategorized

Announcing The World War One On Film Blogathon

This year is the centenary of the end of WW1. The horror and immense slaughter of the trenches has been the focus of many films and TV series over the years. I wanted to mark the real life anniversary of the end of this war by getting us all to write about the many depictions of WW1 found on screen. 

For this blogathon you can write about any feature film, TV film, TV episode, or documentary which focuses on WW1. Films, series and documentaries from any era are very welcome.

You can write about films or series set on the battlefield. You can write about films and series focusing on soldiers,sailors, pilots and medics. You can write about films and series focusing on soldiers coming home from the war and dealing with their injuries and shell shock. You can write about films and series taking place on the homefront during this time.

The blogathon will be held on the 10th and 11th of November, 2018. Please post your entries on either of those two days. You are very welcome to post your entries early too. I will accept two duplicate posts per screen title.

You can write more than one post if you want to. Previously published articles and reviews are welcome too.

Please check the participation list below to see who is writing about what. Please take the banner below and pop it on your site somewhere to help advertise the event.

Participation List

Maddy Loves Her Classic Films: King and Country and All Quiet On The Western Front(1930)

Lifesdailylessonsblog: Gallipoli

Realweegiemidgetreviews: My Boy Jack

Cinematic Scribblings: The Spy In Black and The Green Room

Down These Mean Streets: Waterloo Bridge(1940)

Movie Movie Blog Blog: Block-Heads

Caftan Woman: Broken Lullaby

The Stop Button: The Life and Death Of Colonel Blimp

Silver Screen Classics: Gallipoli

Dubism: Sergeant York and  Paths Of Glory

In The Good Old Days Of Classic Hollywood: Wings

The Wonderful World Of Cinema: Au revoir la-haut

Silver Screenings: The Grand Illusion 

The Midnite-Drive In: The Christmas Truce Of 1914(documentary) and Joyeux Noel(film)

Thoughts All Sorts: Der Rote Baron

Movierob: The Blue Max and The Fighting 69th

Movie Crash Course: The Big Parade

WW1 banner 1

Noir, Uncategorized

Blade Runner Reimagined as a Classic Era Noir Film

I really love Ridley Scott’s 1982 film Science Fiction Noir film Blade Runner. I watched the film again recently, and I found myself wondering what this film would have been like if it had been made as a Noir film in the 1940’s or 1950’s.

So I sat and had a long think about who to direct and who to cast in this classic Noir version of the film.

The Director

I would have had Fritz Lang and Edward Dmytryk co-direct this film. I thought of Fritz Lang because of his stellar work in creating a futuristic city and society in his film Metropolis. That expertise would have been much needed to create the futuristic looking city the film is set in.

Lang also directed one of the darkest and most brutal Noir films, The Big Heat, so I’m pretty sure that he would have had no trouble bringing a Sci-Fi Noir film to the screen. 

I thought of Edward Dmytryk because he directed the best Noir film (in my opinion)Murder My Sweet(1944); this is a film which oozes Noir from every single frame. He would have done wonders with the characters, the lighting, and with the overall look and mood of the film I think. 

The Cast

I thought of Charles McGraw for the role of Detective Rick Deckard.

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Charles McGraw. Screenshot by me.

I think that Charles could give Deckard the tough quality he needs as a replicant hunter(known as Blade Runners). I also think that he could show the softer side of the man when necessary in certain scenes.

 

I thought of Gene Tierney for the role of Rachel, a woman who may or may not be a replicant. Gene always did a good job of playing haughty, reserved women with a hint of mystery about them.

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Gene Tierney. Screenshot by me.

I also think that she could easily capture the unreadable and troubled aspects of the character, while also being able to make her vulnerable and innocent during certain scenes.

 

I thought of Robert Ryan for the role of Roy Batty, the intelligent and violent leader of the escaped replicants.

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Robert Ryan. Screenshot by me.

I think that he could easily convey the intensity, the strength and the rage of Roy, yet also perfectly capture his emotional struggle and also convey his gentle and tender side too. 

 

I thought of Clifton Webb for the role of Dr. Tyrell, the intellectual and scientific genius who created the replicants.

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Clifton Webb. Screenshot by me.

Clifton always convinced as intelligent characters who were self assured, dignified, smug and confident. I think he would be perfect in this role. 

 

I thought of Gloria Grahame for the role of Pris, who is one of the escaped replicants. I think Gloria would be a good choice because she always had a mix of childlike innocence about her and conveyed intelligence and sultriness at the same time.

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Gloria Grahame. Screenshot by me.

Pris is a character who looks innocent, is curious, is childlike at times, and is also a very smart and manipulative woman. I think Gloria would have been awesome in this role.

 

I thought of Marie Windsor for the role of Zhora, another of the escaped replicants who won’t give up without a fight. Marie always had a toughness about her that I think would make her perfect for this role.

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Marie Windsor. Screenshot by me.

I also think that Marie would have been great in the club scenes. I think she would have been terrific in the scene in the dressing room where Zhora shows no inhibitions around Deckard. 

 

I thought of Edward G. Robinson for the role of J.F Sebastian, the genetic designer who works alongside Dr. Tyrell. Sebastian is kind to Roy and Pris and he takes them to see Tyrell.

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Edward G. Robinson. Screenshot by me.

I thought of Eddie G because he had a knack for playing kind and well meaning characters who get themselves in a situation that they can’t easily get back out of. I think he would been able to convey the intelligence of his character, also his good nature, and also his fear of Roy. 

 

Would you have watched this film? What do you think of the cast I selected? I’d love to know who you would cast as directors or actors in this. Who would you cast if it had been made outside of America?

Are there any other films which you can imagine as a classic era film? Start a post and share it with us.

Blogathons, Uncategorized

Announcing The Second Annual Alfred Hitchcock Blogathon

Last year I held an Alfred Hitchcock blogathon, it was a huge success and featured so many terrific Hitchcock related reviews and articles.The event ran for three days and you can read day 1 entries here, day 2 entries here, and day 3 entries here.

I have decided to run this blogathon again this year. I do hope that you can all join me in celebrating Alfred Hitchcock’s films. You can write about any of Hitchcock’s films. You can write about his TV series. You can write about Hitchcock himself, or about the actors and characters featured in his films and series.

You can write more than one entry if you wish to do so. I will accept two duplicates per film title. Previously published reviews and articles are more than welcome.

The blogathon will be held for two days on the 6th and 7th of July, 2018. 

Just let me know what you would like to write about in the comments section below.Check the participation list to see who is writing about what. Take one of the banners from below and pop it on your site somewhere to help promote the event. Have fun writing!

Participation List

Maddylovesherclassicfilms: Rebecca and Vertigo

Silver Screen Classics: The 39 Steps

Down These Mean Streets: Notorious

The Humpo Show: Saboteur

Sat In Your Lap: The Wrong Man

Caftan Woman: Stage Fright

Wolffian Classics Movies Digest: Rear Window

Sparks From A Combustible Mind: The Trouble With Harry

Cracked Rear Viewer: Dial M For Murder

Realweegiemidgetreviews: Four O’Clock(episode of the TV series Suspicion)

dbmoviesblog: The Birds

Bonnywood Manor: Topaz

Vinnieh: Shadow Of A Doubt

Films On The Box: The Skin Game

Silver Screenings: Rope

Poppity: Marnie and North By Northwest

Retro Movie Buff: Foreign Correspondent 

The Wonderful World Of Cinema: Lifeboat

The Stop Button: Young And Innocent

Taking Up Room: Blackmail and The Man Who Knew Too Much(1934)

The Midnite Drive-In: Psycho and Hitchcock(biopic of Hitch starring Anthony Hopkins)

Cinema Essentials: Dial M For Murder

In The Good Old Days Of Classic Hollywood: Mr. and Mrs. Smith and North By Northwest

Cary Grant Won’t Eat You: Torn Curtain

Pure Entertainment Preservation Society: Rebecca

Hitchcock blogathon 4

Hitchcock Blogathon 3

Hitchcock blogathon 5

Hitchcock blogathon 2018 1

David Lean 1I am also hosting another blogathon celebrating the film director David Lean. I’d love you to take part in that too. You can learn more and sign up here. 

Uncategorized

The Duo Double Feature Blogathon: William Holden and Audrey Hepburn

Movie Duo blogathonThe Flapper Dame and Phyllis Loves Classic Movies are hosting this blogathon all about screen duos who only ever made two films together. Be sure to visit their sites to read all the entries. I can’t wait to read them all myself.

I’m writing about one of my favourite screen couples. Who are they? That couple are William Holden and Audrey Hepburn. They were two of the most popular American film stars of the 1950’s and 60’s, and they sure did have some amazing chemistry with one another. You would have thought that they would have been paired together more regularly, sadly that was just not to be. 

They only ended up working together twice in their entire careers. I like them so much because they have such incredible chemistry, they really make you feel and believe their respective characters growing feelings for one another. There are some romantic screen teams out there that fit together like hands in gloves; Myrna Loy and William Powell, Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn, Walter Pidgeon and Greer Garson etc. I consider William and Audrey to be one of those types of screen couples.

The couple were first paired together in Sabrina (1954). This charming romantic comedy tells the story of a chauffer’s daughter (Audrey Hepburn) who is in love with two wealthy brothers (William Holden and Humphrey Bogart). They both love her in return, but which of the two will end up capturing her heart forever? If you haven’t seen the film I won’t spoil the final outcome for you.

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Audrey and William share a dance in Sabrina. Screenshot by me.

Audrey and William shine in their shared scenes together here. There is a real warmth and tenderness between them that really helps in their romantic scenes. During the making of this film the pair fell in love and had a brief affair, so their chemistry is the real thing and it really does show on screen.

Sadly their real life relationship didn’t have a happy ending. Audrey was desperate for children and William having had a vasectomy couldn’t give her that which she desired above all else. Plus William was also married at the time which put an obstacle in their path of happiness, but he certainly fell hard for Audrey no doubt about it.

In this film I love them the most in the dance scene out on the terrace, they fit together perfectly and look so at ease in each others arms. I think that it is more than simply acting between them in that scene, there is a real connection between them that you can see. The way William looks at her I think it’s like he’s looking into her soul, and she looks at him with such adoration and joy in her face. I could watch these two dance and flirt forever and still feel that magical connection and still be enchanted by them.

I also really love them in the scene outside the train station where Holden’s car screeches to a halt when he sees Audrey waiting for a taxi. Their comic back and forth banter in the sequence is a real joy, and once again their reactions to one another are so genuine.

The couple were reunited on screen ten years later. This time to star in the extremely underrated Paris When It Sizzles, a romantic comedy that is also one big in joke about filmmaking. The film pokes fun at many different film related things, from method acting, to how scriptwriters come up with their stories. 

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William and Audrey in Paris When It Sizzles. Screenshot by me.

A secretary (Audrey Hepburn)is sent to Paris to type up the latest script from a famous film screenwriter (William Holden). She gets drawn into his imagination and the two also find themselves falling in love. We also see all the possible plots he comes up with acted out by William and Audrey playing the different characters from the screenplay.

It was difficult for William to make this film as he still had feelings for Audrey, and at this time he was also drinking rather heavily. There are moments in this film when he looks at her and you can tell that it is not his character looking at her with longing, it is William himself looking at the woman he loves.

It’s quite painful to watch them at times actually in this one because you feel his longing, and when you know what was going on behind the scenes your heart goes out to him. It must have been agony for him to have been so close to her and knowing he couldn’t have her. That agony and longing in a weird way actually works for the film. William’s character finds himself more and more attracted to Audrey’s secretary, but he finds it difficult to pursue his feelings when they have work to do and he’s also not sure if she returns his feelings.

There is still that genuine warmth and magic between Audrey and William on screen here, and they both look like they are enjoying the opportunity to have lots of fun in the scenes such as the vampire at the grotto, and the scene when they order room service (I love the way Audrey makes that order and the look on William’s face when he hears her place the order.)  🙂

I love them the most in all the scenes in this where they kiss, those kisses are so tender and passionate. I also love them in the scene where they are playing the rich couple who both mention having had giraffes as children, the way they act in that and deliver the lines cracks me up every time I watch that film.

Perfect timing, natural chemistry and genuine affection for each other help these two become a perfect screen team. I was so disappointed when I first found out that they only made two films, I was so looking forward to seeing them in more films. Oh well, at least their screen magic can be enjoyed over and over again in these two films.

Well those are just a few of the reasons why I love these two so much. If you have never seen William and Audrey act together, I suggest that you take a look at the films I mentioned and watch them together for yourselves. I hope you like this screen duo as much as I do. Happy viewing.  🙂 

Any other fans of William and Audrey? Please leave your comments below.

Uncategorized

The Unpopular Film Opinion Tag

Catherine, over at Thoughtsallsorts has tagged me for this. I appreciate the tag, and many thanks for this.  This tag was started by Richard, over at TheHumpoShow .

The Rules

1 – Pick 3 films that are well liked by most people, except by you.
2 – Tag 5 or more people to get involved.
3 – Thank the person who tagged you.

Well, where (and how)do I start this?

1 – I’m a big fan of David Lean, but I cannot stand Doctor Zhivago! I like the visuals and the music but that is as far as my love for this one goes I’m afraid. For some reason most of the acting comes across as stiff to me and I just don’t care one bit about Zhivago and Lara. It seems really dull too, which I consider to be hugely unusual for a Lean film.

2-  I like Nicole Kidman, Hugh Jackman and Baz Luhrmann, but I felt that Australia was a mess! I think it tried to tackle too much instead of just focusing on a couple of things. While Nicole and Hugh have some lovely scenes I just can’t get emotionally invested in their characters or care when bad things happened to them. I so wanted to like this and I have tried to rewatch it several times. It still does nothing for me I’m afraid.

3- My third choice isn’t a film but a TV series. True Detective has talented stars, one of the best theme tunes in recent years, and some awesome photography. It had such potential, and I was so looking forward to it when it came out. I sadly had the opposite reaction to many viewers who praised it highly.  What we get is a convoluted plot that reaches David Lynch levels of weirdness. At first I was hooked, a few episodes in I had lost interest, by the end I was just open mouthed in disbelief and shaking my head in confusion.  My final verdict on this one? Plain weird!

I tag the following bloggers.

Charlene over at Charlene’smostlyclassicmoviereviews

Paul over at Pfeiffer Pfilms and Meg Movies

Fritzi over at Movies Silently

Virginie over at Thewonderfulworldofcinema

Janet over at Sister Celluloid

Please feel free to join in, even if you haven’t been tagged by anyone taking part. You can leave your answers here in the comments below, or you can write a post on your own site. Have fun!