Tag Archives: Blogathon

The Gothic Horror Blogathon: The Tomb Of Ligeia(1964)

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This is my first entry for my friend Gabriela’s latest blogathon, which is dedicated to all things Gothic Horror. Be sure to visit her site later this month to read all of the entries, I can’t wait to read them all myself. 

The history of Gothic Horror and Gothic Romance stretches all the way back to 1764, the year in which author Horace Walpole had his novel The Castle Of Otranto published, this novel is generally considered to be the first Gothic novel ever written. Many authors including Ann Radcliffe, Edgar Allen Poe, Matthew Lewis, Daphne Du Maurier, Mary Shelley, Clara Reeve, Emily and Charlotte Bronte all followed in Warpole’s footsteps penning dark and chilling Gothic tales over the coming centuries. 

The main tropes usually present in Gothic literature and films are mansions or castles which have dark secrets and mysteries waiting to be uncovered within their walls; a Byronic male love interest who is not what he seems, or who harbours dark or tragic secrets; and a curious and strong willed heroine who seeks to uncover the secrets and to help her troubled man. Many of the greatest Gothic stories seem to work best when their setting is the 1700’s or 1800’s, but there are later stories and films, such as Daphne Du Maurier’s Rebecca, which work just as well with a more modern setting. 

Tomb Of Ligeia

The Tomb Of Ligeia is one of my favourite Gothic Horror films. While it is certainly a creepy horror film, it is at heart a beautiful and tragic love story. I especially love how this film manages to capture the eerie atmosphere, darkness, tragedy and beauty of Edgar Allen Poe’s work, while also being a very touching love story. This has become my favourite film from the Poe cycle of films directed by Roger Corman. 

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Beware the cat guarding the grave. Screenshot by me.

In 1964, the American horror director Roger Corman was here in the UK to begin work on what would be his eighth and final screen adaptation of a story by Edgar Allen Poe. The film was The Tomb Of Ligeia, which was based upon Poe’s 1838 short story Ligeia. This story may well have been written and published before Poe’s far more famous other literary works came along, but it remains one of his darkest and most tragic tales.

           It’s hard to imagine anyone other than Vincent as Verden Fell. Screenshot by me. 

Roger would once again be reunited with Vincent Price on this film. Vincent had become Roger’s regular leading man in the previous Poe films he had made. Although much older than the character in Poe’s story, Vincent never the less suits the role of Verden Fell perfectly, and it is very difficult to imagine anyone else other than him in the role. It was very nearly the case though that Vincent wasn’t cast in the lead role. 

Both Roger Corman and screenwriter Robert Towne(later to find fame as the writer of Chinatown)were actually against Vincent taking the role due to his age. Roger Corman wanted Richard Chamberlain to take the role instead. Vincent’s casting ended up becoming a condition of the films production company AIP(American-International Pictures) in investing in the film, and so he was cast as the lead.

Vincent was of course such a big name at the time, and he had become so linked to the horror genre and the Poe films, that he was a massive draw for audiences when these films were released. He also fit this material perfectly and had done so ever since he was cast in the 1946 Gothic drama Dragonwyck. He brings an emotional depth to the role of Verden Fell that I don’t think would have been there if another actor had been cast. 

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Rowena discovers Ligeia’s grave. Screenshot by me. 

British actress Elizabeth Shepherd was cast alongside Vincent in the duel role of the bright and passionate Rowena, and the sinister and dark Ligeia. Elizabeth absolutely steals the film with her brilliant performance. The film was made on location in Britain, with a large portion of it being shot at the Castle Acre Priory in Norfolk. This film feels and looks quite different from so many of the other Corman/Poe adaptations and the location work is a big reason why in my opinion. So many of the other films in the Poe cycle were very studio bound, whereas this one gains a realism due to the location work. The film also looks different due to a great many scenes taking place outside in daylight and sunshine, but its content is no less dark and strange because of it.

“She will not rest, because she is not dead….to me. And she will not die because she willed not to die.” Verden Fell

The film tells the tragic love story of the vivacious and fearless Lady Rowena(Elizabeth Shepherd)and the brooding and mysterious Verden Fell(Vincent Price). The pair meet after Rowena breaks away from a local hunt and rides into the ruins of the abbey where Verden lives. She comes across a graveyard in the ruins, and there she finds the grave of the Lady Ligeia(also played by Elizabeth), who was Verden’s wife. 

                      Rowena and Verden first set eyes on each other. Screenshot by me.

Ligeia’s grave is guarded by her pet black cat, who lashes out at Elizabeth startling her horse and causing her to fall off and hurt herself. Verden(clad all in black and rocking a pair of sunglasses which look like the ones from the 1933 Invisible Man film) then suddenly appears and tends to the injured Rowena. We can see that as soon as they meet one another they are each drawn to the other. Rowena bears a uncanny resemblance to Ligeia, which is an added attraction for Verden. 

Verden seems absolutely grief stricken by the death of his wife. At first he reminds me somewhat of Heathcliff from Wuthering Heights with how he cannot let his wife leave his side to go to the land of the dead. Verden is constantly at Ligeia’s graveside and is convinced that she will come back to life and be with him again. As the film progresses we learn that there is a dark and terrible reason why he is acting like that, and it isn’t because of grief and love either. Sometimes Verden seems to hate Rowena and becomes afraid of her presence one minute, and then becomes deeply remorseful for his behaviour and becomes gentle and kind to her the next. 

              That time Vincent Price borrowed The Invisible Man’s shades. Screenshot by me. 

As the film goes on, Verden and Rowena fall in love and get married. Rowena soon discovers that in Verden’s home the dead do not stay dead, and that due to some strange supernatural power, the Lady Ligeia is exerting her will on Verden from beyond the grave. Rowena must find the strength to save her husband and herself, while also trying to fight against forces which are beyond both her understanding and her control. 

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Lady Rowena is one of the great heroines of Gothic cinema. Screenshot by me.

Rowena is one of the strongest Gothic heroines in my opinion. Interestingly the film version of Rowena is very different to the character in Poe’s story, in which Rowena really has no personality and is merely there as a plot device. In the film however, Rowena is brave, strong, self-sufficient, and she has a very strong will indeed. When describing Rowena to Christopher(John Westbrook), a young man of her own class who wants to marry her, Rowena’s father(Derek Francis) says this of her: “Wilful little b***h, ain’t she? Hell to be married to I should think. Her mother certainly was… God rest her soul”. 

Rowena doesn’t conform to the docile female persona that men of the time felt their women should have. Rowena knows what she wants and goes after it. She likes to make her own decisions and she isn’t afraid of darkness and danger. She also has no interest in marrying for money or in marrying the safe and approved type of men she is so often thrown together with. Rowena sees that Verden is brooding, broken and even a little dangerous and frightening, and yet she wants to be with him because she loves him. He in turn genuinely falls in love with her too, and even though he cannot get Ligeia out of his mind, he does try his best with his new wife. 

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What is the truth about Verden? Screenshot by me.

Vincent is excellent as Verden. The character is at first glance the typical Byronic leading man of a Gothic tale, a man of mystery. I love how Vincent draws us in with his performance and makes us at first think he is a heartbroken and damaged man, somewhat akin to Mr. Rochester from Jane Eyre, a man longing to meet a fresher, purer woman to be his great love. While some of that description is true, the more we see of Verden, the more that Vincent alters how he plays the character. Vincent’s performance gets much darker and stranger, and he lets us see that there is something more going on here than the typical Gothic character trope we first imagine and assume. Verden also interestingly turns out to be the real victim of the piece rather than Rowena.  He is also a victim twice over; once due to what we learn has been happening to him, and secondly because of what happens to him at the end of the film. I really like Verden and Rowena and I’m always sad that they don’t get the happiness they deserve, but then it wouldn’t really be a Gothic Horror if that were to happen. 😁

In addition to its intriguing and eerie story, excellent lead and supporting performances, and beautiful costume design, I also want to praise the lovely and suitably atmospheric score by Kenneth V. Jones. The gorgeous cinematography by Hammer regular Arthur Grant is also terrific. 

I’m of the opinion that The Tomb Of Ligeia is one of the best Gothic Horror/Gothic Romances ever put on screen. It’s also a great deal of spooky fun and a real character piece. You could do much worse than spend an hour and a half with Vincent, Elizabeth and company. 

What are your thoughts on the film? 

The Noirathon Begins

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The time has come for all us guys and dames who love Film Noir to assemble here at Maddy’s Club. Over the next three days, a large number of Noir fans will share their reviews and articles on all things Film Noir. Keep checking back to this post over the next three days to read all the entries.  

Massive thanks to those of you who are taking part. I can’t wait to read all those entries. 

Day 3 Entries

Gabriela from Pale Writer returns with a second entry, this time discussing the pairing of Alan Ladd and Veronica Lake in Noir films.

Pure Entertainment Preservation Society discusses The Dark Mirror

Ruth from Silver Screenings discusses the villain in Kansas City Confidential. 

Movie Night’s Group Guide To Classic Films writes about The Blue Gardenia.

Movie Rob takes a look at The Woman In The Window.

Gabriela from Pale Writer brings Lizabeth Scott to the Noir party, with her article on Dead Reckoning.

Mike from Films On The Box shares his thoughts on Fear In The Night, a 1940’s Noir starring DeForest Kelley.

Erica from Poppity Talks Classic Film, discusses the Noir classic They live By Night.

Movie Rob talks about about Scene Of The Crime, a Noir starring Van Johnson.

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Day 2 Entries

Quiggy at the Midnite Drive-In tells us all about Abbot And Costello parodying Film Noir

The Lonely Critic brings some Japanese Noir to the party, as he discusses High And Low. 

Movie Rob discusses the Barbara Stanwyck classic Sorry, Wrong Number

Le from Critica Retro discusses Tension, a Noir from 1949. 

Clarissa from Stars And Letters shares letters from famous fans of The Killers.

Realweegiemidget joins us a second time to discuss John Wick: Chapter 3 .

John V’s Eclectic Avenue shares his thoughts on The Chase.

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Day 1 Entries

Carol from The Old Hollywood Garden discusses friendships in Film Noir.

Portraits From Jenni writes about one of the best Noir’s of the 1950’s, the gripping Pickup On South Street

Noirish discusses The True Story Of Lynn Stuart, a lesser known Noir film from 1958.

Paddy from Caftan Woman joins all the Noir fun, by sharing her thoughts on Thieves Highway. 

Andrew from The Stop Button shares his thoughts on In A Lonely Place, one of the most famous of all Noir films. 

Gill from Realweegiemidgetreviews brings Keanu Reeves to the Noir party. She discusses John Wick: Chapter 2, which is a modern Noir. 

Erin from Cinematic Scribblings invites us to take a trip to the British seaside, for her review of the brilliant British Noir Brighton Rock

Steve from Movie Movie Blog Blog II joins us to discuss Laura, truly one of the great classics of the genre. 

I write about Murder, My SweetCry Of The City and Dark Passage.

Announcing The Noirathon

Regular readers of this blog know that I LOVE Film Noir. I’ve decided it’s high time I held a blogathon celebrating all things Noir.  

I invite you all to join me to walk through the dark alleys of Film Noir. For this blogathon you can write about any Noir film. You can write about your favourite characters and couples in Film Noir. You can write about the look and style of Noir films. You can write about the history of Film Noir and the impact these films had on cinema.

You can write more than one post for this if you wish to do so. I’m asking that there be No duplicate posts of films for this particular blogathon. There are so many Noir films out there that we shouldn’t need to all write about the same ones. That having been said though, if someone writes a full post about Double Indemnity, it is fine for someone else to write a bit about that film in a list/article which discusses various Noir films. It’s also fine to write about a remake of a Noir film of the same title. 

The blogathon will be held from the 27th – 29th of July, 2019. Please try to have your posts ready on or before those dates. Take one of the banners from below to put on your sites to help advertise this event. Check below to see who is writing about what. 

Have fun writing! Enjoy watching those Noir films!

The Participation List

Maddy Loves Her Classic Films: Cry Of The City, Dark Passage & Murder, My Sweet(1944)

Pale Writer: Dead Reckoning,  Alan Ladd and Veronica Lake

Screen Dreams: Barbara Stanwyck’s Noir Films

Films On The Box: Fear In The Night

Movie Movie Blog Blog II: Laura

Cinematic Scribblings: Brighton Rock(1948)

Caftan Woman: Thieves Highway

Poppity Talks Classic Film: They Live By Night

Realweegiemidgetreviews: Body Heat 

Overture Books And Film: The Killing 

Silver Screen Classics: The Asphalt Jungle

In The Good Old Days Of Classic Hollywood: Katharine Hepburn And Film Noir

The Stop Button: In A Lonely Place

Portraits By Jenni: Pickup On South Street

The Old Hollywood Garden: Friendships In Film Noir

Critica Retro: Tension

Silver Screenings: Kansas City Confidential 

Pop Culture Reverie: Somewhere In The Night

The Midnite Drive -In: Noir Elements in Abbott And Costello

Stars And Letters: A Letter About The Killers

Realweegiemidgetreviews: John Wick 2 and 3

dbmoviesblog: Out Of The Past

Thoughts All Sorts: Sin City

Pure Entertainment Preservation Society: The Dark Mirror

Shadowsandsatin: Try And Get Me

The Lonely Critic: High And Low

MovieRob: Scene Of The Crime, Sorry Wrong Number, Woman In The Window

MovieNightGroup: The Blue Gardenia

Noirish: The True Story Of Lynn Stuart

John V’s Eclectic Avenue: The Chase

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Announcing The Second Remembering Barbara Stanwyck Blogathon

Myself and Crystal from In The Good Old Days Of Classic Hollywood are teaming up together to bring you our next blogathon.  

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Barbara in All I Desire. Screenshot by me.

We have decided to honour a lady who was one of the most talented and popular actresses of the classic film era.

The subject of our blogathon is the legendary Barbara Stanwyck. 

Known affectionately by those who knew her as “Missy”, Barbara became famous for her natural acting style. She also became well known for playing strong, independent and intelligent characters in her films. 

Barbara Stanwyck dominated the screen in every single scene that she appeared in. She is one of those actors who could say so much with just a look or expression. 

For this blogathon you can write about any of Barbara’s films,TV series, or TV episodes. You can write tributes to her. You can write about her acting ability. You can write about her whole life and career. You can write about her lovely friendship with William Holden. You can write about your favourite Barbara Stanwyck performances. Perhaps you met or corresponded with her and want to tell us about that?

We will accept two duplicates per screen title. You can write more than one post if you wish to, but we ask that you please don’t write more than three.

The blogathon will be held on the 20th, 21st and 22nd of January, 2019. I will be your hostess on the 20th. Crystal will be your hostess on the 21st and 22nd. Please send us your entries on or before those dates.  

Let us know what you want to write about below. Take one of Crystal’s lovely banners to put on your site to help promote the event. Have fun writing about Barbara and watching her films.

Films claimed twice: Ball Of Fire and Sorry,Wrong Number 

The Particpation List

Maddy Loves Her Classic Films: All I Desire

In The Good Old Days Of Classic Hollywood: Topic to be decided

                       Pale Writer: Christmas In Connecticut  and The Thorn Birds

A Shroud Of Thoughts: The Lady Eve

Love Letters To Old Hollywood: Ball Of Fire

Wide Screen World: Three episodes of the Barbara Stanwyck Show

Down These Mean Streets: Double Indemnity

Vinnieh: No Man Of Her Own

Caftan Woman: Banjo On My Knee

Poppity Talks Classic Film: The Two Mrs. Carrolls

Silver Screen Classics: Sorry,Wrong Number

Lisa Alkana: Guest post on In The Good Old Days Of Classic Hollywood: Crime Of Passion 

Top 10 Film Lists: Barbara Stanwyck And Film Noir

The Story Enthusiast: Lady Of Burlesque

Realweegiemidgetreviews: The Colbys

The Stop Button: The Purchase Price

Movie Rob: Stella Dallas and Ball Of Fire

Dubsism: The Big Valley

Taking Up Room: Titanic

Critica Retro: The Mad Miss Manton

The Dream Book Blog: The Locked Door

The Midnight-Drive In: Forty Guns

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Announcing The Ava Gardner Blogathon

After toying with the idea for a while now, I have decided that I want to try and host one more blogathon this year. The subject for the last 2018 blogathon will be Ava Gardner.

Ava would have been 96 years old this year. I decided that I would hold this blogathon over two days, one of which is her birthday. I do hope that you will all join me to celebrate the life and career of this screen legend. Ava is someone who I admire a great deal. What you saw with Ava was what you got. Ava was open, generous, kind, fun and honest. She always seemed so down to earth too. 

For this blogathon you can write about any of Ava’s films. You can write about your favourite Ava Gardner performances. You can write a tribute to her. You can write about her life and career. I will accept two duplicates per screen title. You may write more than one post if you wish, but no more than three posts per person please. 

The blogathon will be held on the 23rd and 24th of December, 2018. If Ava was still with us today, she would be celebrating her 96th birthday on the 24th of December this year. 

If you would like to join in the fun, simply let me know what you want to write about below. Take one of the banners from below and put it on your site somewhere to help promote the event. Have fun writing about Ava and watching her films.

 

Films that have now already been chosen twice are The Killers, Pandora And The Flying Dutchman and Mogambo.

 

Participation List

Maddy Loves Her Classic Films: Pandora And The Flying Dutchman

Poppity: The Angel Wore Red

Dubsism: Earthquake

Movie Rob: Mogambo and Night Of The Iguana

Down These Mean Streets: The Killers

Caftan Woman: Whistle Stop

Palewriter2: Lone Star

Silver Screen Classics: The Killers

Realweegiemidgetreviews: The Cassandra Crossing

Musings Of A Classic Film Addict: Write up about her visit to the Ava Gardner Museum

The Stop Button: Seven Days In May

Silver Screenings: Mogambo

Vinnieh: Pandora And The Flying Dutchman

Diary Of A Movie Maniac: 55 Days At Peking

                                        Overture Books And Films: The Great Sinner

Critica Retro: One Touch Of Venus

In The Good Old Days Of Classic Hollywood: East Side, West Side

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