Uncategorized

Announcing The Stewart Granger Blogathon

Happy New Year to you all. I would like to invite you all to join me this April to celebrate Stewart Granger. Stewart Granger was born James Lablache Stewart, in Kensington, London, on the 6th of May 1913.Changing his name(we can’t have two Jimmy Stewart’s)to Stewart Granger, he would go on to become one of the biggest film stars of the 1940’s, 50’s and 60’s. 

Stewart was one of the most intense and handsome leading men of the classic film era. With that distinctive voice of his, coupled with his smouldering good looks and intense presence, Stewart Granger is someone who you don’t forget in a hurry. 

Photo1554
Stewart Granger in Footsteps In The Fog. Screenshot by me.

Stewart worked in his native Britain for much of his career. Gainsborough melodramas were the films in which he first gained fame. 

He would go on to become a big star in America too. He could play gentle and romantic men, as well as brooding and dark villains or troubled men. He was married to Jean Simmons for ten years. 

For this blogathon you can write about any of Stewart’s films or TV appearances. You can write about the films he made with Jean Simmons. You can focus on his British or his American film career. You can write a tribute to him. If you ever met or corresponded with him you can write about that experience too. If you have never seen one of his films before, why not take this opportunity to finally do so?

The blogathon will be held on the 13th and 14th of April, 2019. Please post your entries on or before those dates. I will accept just the two duplicates per screen title. You may post up to three entries each if you wish to do so. 

Take one of the banners below to place on your site to help promote the event. Let me know what you want to write about below. Check the participation list below to see which titles have been claimed. Have fun writing about Stewart and watching his films. 

The Participation List

Maddy Loves Her Classic Films: Caravan

Pale Writer: Love Story and Footsteps In The Fog

Pleasant Street: The Man In Grey

Realweegiemidgetreviews: The Wild Geese

The Stop Button: Moonfleet

Mikestakeonthemovies: The Secret Invasion

Dubsism: King Solomon’s Mines

Catftan Woman: The Last Hunt

MovieRob: Sodom And Gomorrah and The Secret Invasion

The Midnite Drive-In: North To Alaska

Poppity: Scaramouche and Fanny By Gaslight

Stewart Granger Blogathon 3

 

Stewart Granger Blogathon 2

Stewart Granger blogathon 1

Advertisements
Uncategorized

The Ava Gardner Blogathon Arrives

The big event has finally arrived! Over the next two days several wonderful bloggers are joining me to celebrate Ava Gardner. I decided to host this blogathon due to Ava being a great favourite of mine. The blogathon is also being held on these particular dates because the 24th of December is Ava’s birthday. 

Check back to this post over the next two days to read all of the entries. I’ll update this post as often as I can do. I am now on Twitter @maddylovesherclassicfilms. I will be promoting all the entries for this blogathon over on Twitter too.

Ava Gardner banner

Day 2 Entries

Poppity writes about Ava’s 1960 film The Angel Wore Red.

 

Diary Of A Movie Maniac tells us all about 55 Days At Peking.

 

Overture Books And Film writes about another lesser known Ava film called The Great Sinner.

 

Pale Writer writes about a little known Ava Gardner film called Riding For Glory.

 

Movie Rob writes about Mogambo. He also writes about The Night Of The Iguana

 

Vinnieh shares his thoughts on Pandora And The Flying Dutchman.

 

Critica Retro writes about the delightful film One Touch Of Venus.

 

Musings Of A Classic Film Addict tells us about her visit to the Ava Gardner museum.

 

Day 1 Entries

Silver Screenings gets the blogathon off to a terrific start, with this excellent post about Ava’s character in the film Mogambo

 

Down These Mean Streets tells us about the time Ava played an unforgettable Femme Fatale in The Killers

 

Caftan Woman takes a look at Ava’s 1946 Noir Whistle Stop

 

Dubsism writes about the sports analogies hidden in Ava’s disaster film Earthquake.

 

Realweegiemidgetreviews discusses The Cassandra Crossing.

 

The Stop Button writes about Ava’s performance in Seven Days In May.

 

I talk about the romantic fantasy Pandora And The Flying Dutchman

Uncategorized

The Ava Gardner Blogathon: Pandora And The Flying Dutchman(1951)

Ava Gardner banner 2.PNG

This is my entry for my Ava Gardner blogathon being held on the 23rd and 24th of December, 2018. 

Photo1497
Pandora And The Dutchman kissing on the beach. With the yacht in the background. Screenshot by me.

Watching this film is like entering a vivid dream. The only film that I can really compare it to is Portrait Of Jennie, as both of these films have this dreamlike quality and poetic and haunting atmosphere.

Pandora And The Flying Dutchman is a film that I think you have to completely surrender yourself to for it to work the way it should.

The film is a slow build and it is one that is all about emotion and mood. The film is surreal, artistic and truly beautiful to look at. The story is a mix of romance, mystery, tragedy, the supernatural and fantasy.

I also like how the film can be viewed in two ways. It is pretty clear that the mysterious Captain is the real Dutchman, and that all that happens later is due to some supernatural power or some fantastical element. Yet you can also view all that happens as mere coincidence only, and you can think that the characters believe the legend and somehow make it seem like it has come true.

The film is inspired by the legend of the doomed Flying Dutchman, a man who is cursed to sail the world for all eternity. In this film the Dutchman has been cursed after he murders the woman he loves. The cursed man sails the globe alone for centuries. His curse can be lifted if he falls in love with a woman who loves him so much that she will die for him(imagine having that conversation on a first date!)

The film was directed and written by Albert Lewin(The Picture Of Dorian Gray, The Moon And Sixpence). The film features beautiful colour photography by the legendary Jack Cardiff(Ava never looked more beautiful than she does in this film, thanks partly to the cinematography of Jack Cardiff). Albert and Jack’s vision helps to make this film a real treat, but the undisputed main draw for us in the audience is Ava Gardner and James Mason as the doomed lovers.

Photo1494
Ava is at her most beautiful and bewitching as Pandora. Screenshot by me.

Both James and Ava totally convince as a couple who are drawn to one another for reasons that they can’t quite understand. When they look at each other they really do manage to capture that something inside them both is connecting to one another.

Photo1500
Henrick and Pandora. Screenshot by me.

James has a weariness and otherworldly air about him that makes you believe he is someone who has lived through time. Ava captures the reckless nature of her character perfectly, and she makes it seem like Pandora knows she has been waiting for the Dutchman all her life. 

Pandora And The Flying Dutchman begins on the coast of Esperanza, Spain, in the early 1930’s. Two dead bodies are caught in the nets of local fisherman and are brought back to the beach. Some who gather on the beach know who the dead people are and they are very upset.

In flashback we see what led to this sad event. Our guide and narrator throughout the film is Geoffrey Fielding(Harold Warrender)an archaeologist and historian who knew the two dead people. 

                  Pandora with each of the three other men who love her. Screenshots by me.

Pandora Reynolds(Ava Gardner) is an American woman living in Esperanza. She is  a reckless woman, beautiful, adventurous, fun, destructive, seductive and passionate. Many men are drawn to Pandora. One of her admirers(Marius Goring)commits suicide when he realises he will never really have her love. A fearless and passionate bullfighter(Mario Cabre) becomes crazed with jealousy once he falls for Pandora. Pandora doesn’t really love any of these men. Deep down inside herself, Pandora somehow knows that the man who she is destined to give her heart to is not in her life yet.

Pandora becomes engaged to racing car driver, Stephen Cameron(Nigel Patrick), Stephen has her attention and affection until she becomes intrigued by the owner of a yacht anchored off shore. One night she swims out and climbs onboard. There she meets the mysterious Henrick van der Zee(James Mason). She is a little freaked out when she sees that he has painted a woman who looks just like her. As the film goes on we also see that Pandora looks exactly like the long dead woman Henrick loved and killed(who we later catch sight of  in a portrait). 

                        Pandora and Henrick first set eyes on each other. Screenshots by me.

The pair slowly develop a friendship which quickly turns into love for both of them. Pandora’s love for Henrick also changes her as a person, she becomes kinder, more tender and sensitive. For the first time in her life, Pandora Reynolds experiences the mix of joy and agony that love can bring.

Photo1499
Henrick and Pandora share a kiss. Screenshot by me.

We later learn that Henrick is the Flying Dutchman. The Dutchman realises that the woman who can break his curse is Pandora, and despite his desperation to be free, he just can’t bear to think of her having to give up her life to break the curse. You will have to watch the film to find out what happens next. 

Photo1501
Ava Gardner as Pandora. Screenshot by me.

I can imagine no other actress in the role of Pandora Reynolds. Ava does so much with this character. She is so ethereal in the role. Ava makes us think that this woman has somehow known all her life that this romance and fate is the reason for her birth.

Ava also makes us both love and hate Pandora, maybe hate is too strong a word because I never fully dislike her. The way that she dismisses those who love her so is very cruel to watch though. Ava performs her role from the heart, she lays bare her soul and emotions in this film, more so than in any other performance she ever gave in my opinion. It’s one of her best roles. 

Photo1490
James Mason as the anguished Henrick. Screenshot by me.

James Mason conveys a sorrow and desire that makes you want to reach out and give Henrick a big hug. He totally makes you believe that he is this tired and ancient man.

I love the scene on the beach where Pandora confesses her love for Henrick. In that moment James does such a good job of making us see that Henrick so wants to accept her love, but instead he chooses to push her away to try and save her from possibly being able to break the curse.

Henrick loves Pandora so much that he cannot bear to lose her, even if her loss could set him free from the curse. James and Ava have a lovely chemistry and I would have loved to have seen them together in more films. James was never more intense or full of pain and sorrow than he is in this film. His monologue and performance during the flashback sequence contains some of the best acting he ever did, very moving and powerful indeed.

Nigel Patrick(such an underrated actor), Shelia Sim, Mario Cabre, Marius Goring and Harold Warrender all provide excellent support. I love the side plot of the one sided love that Shelia Sim’s character has for Nigel Patrick’s Stephen, we know that she is the woman who really deserves his love. I always long to see a bit more of that couple later in the film. 

I highly recommend this film to any fan of Ava Gardner. She is the heart of this film. Any other fans of this film out there? What do you think of the film and Ava’s performance?

Uncategorized

Announcing The Third Annual Alfred Hitchcock Blogathon

This blogathon was not only a big success, but it was also so much fun this year and last, that I have decided to make it a yearly event. I will host this blogathon again next year. I do hope that you can all join me in celebrating Alfred Hitchcock and his films.

You can write about any of Hitchcock’s films. You can write about his TV series. You can write about Hitchcock himself, or about the actors and characters featured in his films and series.

You can write more than one entry if you wish to do so. I will accept two duplicates per film title. The blogathon will be held for two days on the 8th and 9th of February, 2019. Please post your entries on or before those dates. 

Just let me know what you would like to write about in the comments section below. Check the participation list to see who is writing about what. Take one of the banners from below and pop it on your site somewhere to help promote the event. Have fun watching Hitchcock’s films and writing about them!

Films now claimed twice: To Catch A Thief, The Lady Vanishes 

Participation List

Maddy Loves Her Classic Films: Favourite Hitchcock Couples 

Pale Writer: Hitchcock Blondes & Anthony Perkins Performance in Psycho

Poppity: Marnie

Silver Screen Classics: Vertigo

Cracked Rear Viewer: Frenzy

Movie Movie Blog Blog: High Anxiety

Portraits By Jenni: The Lady Vanishes

The Midnite Drive-In: Comparison of Strangers On A Train To Throw Momma From The Train

In The Good Old Days Of Classic Hollywood: Rear Window

Sparks From A Combustible Mind: The Birds

Movie Rob: Rope and The Man Who Knew Too Much

Overture Books And Films: Saboteur

Realweegiemidgetreviews: Torn Curtain

Thoughts All Sorts: To Catch A Thief

The Humpo Show: Suspicion

The Stop Button: The Trouble With Harry

The Old Hollywood Garden: Hitchcock’s Macguffins

Diary Of A Movie Maniac: Jamaica Inn and The Lady Vanishes

Stars And Letters: Correspondence About Rebecca

Hitchcock 3 banner 3

Hitchcock 3 banner 1

Hitchcock 3 banner 2

 

Uncategorized

The Neil Simon Blogathon: California Suite (1978)

neilsimonblogathon

Paddy over at Caftan Woman, and Rich over at Wide Screen World, have teamed up to co-host this blogathon celebrating Neil Simon. Be sure to visit their sites to read all of the entries, I can’t wait to read them all myself. 

Neil Simon was a master of comic dialogue. He was also involved with so many great films over the years, that it took me a while to decide which film to cover for this blogathon. After giving it much thought, I’ve decided to write about California Suite.

The film is directed by Herbert Ross. The film is based upon Neil Simon’s 1976 stage play of the same name. The film has four separate storylines. Each story focuses on different characters who are all staying at the same luxury hotel in Beverly Hills. Some of Neil’s funniest and sharpest dialogue can be found in this film.

The first story focuses on two couples from Chicago. The four are all close friends and they are on a long planned holiday to Los Angeles, where they are booked in to stay at the luxury hotel which is featured in all four stories.

Photo1358
The four friends arrive at the hotel. Screenshot by me.

The group consists of Dr. Chauncey Gump(Richard Pryor) and his wife, Lola (Gloria Gifford), Dr. Willis Panama(Bill Cosby) and his wife, Bettina(Sheila Frazier). 

This story is very funny because everything that could possibly go wrong on a holiday does so for this group. On their special trip the friends end up enduring car trouble, major arguments over silly things, food poisoning, bad room locations and much more. 

Photo1363
Richard Pryor as Chauncey. Screenshot by me.

Cosby, Gifford and Frazier are good enough, but I don’t think that there is anything they do that makes their performances particularly memorable.

It is Richard Pryor’s dead pan delivery and reactions to the various things his character endures which really make this story work as well as it does in my opinion.

I really don’t think that this story would work as well as it does if another actor had been cast in Richard’s role.

This story veers into slapstick comedy territory, and to me it often feels like I am watching scenes from a completely different film. This particular story seems to me to be quite similar to the film National Lampoon’s Vacation. 

Photo1359
Diana and Sidney prepare for the Oscars. Screenshot by me.

The second story focuses on the famous British actress, Diana Barry(Maggie Smith)who is in Los Angeles to attend the Academy Awards. Diana is a first time nominee for the Best Actress Oscar.

Diana is joined by her loving husband, Sidney Cochrane(Michael Caine). Diana is highly anxious about the Academy Awards, and she is also very worried about her marriage.

While Diana and Sidney love each other very much, Sidney happens to be Bisexual. Although Diana accepts that fact about him, she can’t stand that he keeps having affairs instead of just being with her. Diana and Sidney must take a long hard look at their marriage and decide whether to stay together or not. 

Photo1365
Sidney and Diana mid argument. Screenshot by me.

This is my personal favourite out of the four stories. Maggie and Michael work so well together and they get many of the funniest and best scenes and lines in the entire film. 

I love how they are warm and tender one minute, and then seriously bitchy with each other the next. Their bickering and arguments are hilarious.

I especially love the fight they have after returning to their hotel room after the Academy Awards.

This story also cracks me up because it highlights the hypocrisy of the awards where the nominees all get fawned over on the way in, but if they lose out, nobody wants to know them when they leave the awards ceremony. I love Sidney’s rant about how everyone else got their cars before Diana and Sidney got theirs at the end of awards ceremony.

I think that all four of the stories had the potential to be a feature length film in their own right, but in my opinion the story of Diana and Sidney could definitely have been made into a feature film. 

Photo1362
Marvin tries to wake Bunny. Screenshot by me.

The third story focuses on middle-aged businessman, Marvin Michaels(Walter Matthau), who has to try and conceal a prostitute called Bunny (Denise Galick)who his brother(Herb Edelman)smuggled into his hotel suite as an early birthday present.

Things get complicated when Marvin’s wife, Millie(Elaine May)arrives at the hotel to join him when the prostitute is still in his room. 

While this does have some funny moments in it, I think this is the weakest of the four stories. None of the characters in this one come across as being remotely likable.

Photo1360
Walter Matthau as Marvin. Screenshot by me.

I also don’t like how Marvin doesn’t seem the least bit concerned for the health of Bunny in the scene where she won’t wake up, he could have at least phoned down for some help. He is just concerned for himself if she is discovered in his room.

If he didn’t want anyone to know she had been his room, then surely he could have taken her out into the corridor, pretended that he found her out there and got some help?

The only positive thing in this segment is Walter Matthau, he was always a very good physical comic and he gets to really do his thing here. I always fast forward through scenes from this story when I watch the film. 

Photo1355
Hannah and Bill have a talk at the beach. Screenshot by me.

The fourth story focuses on Hannah Warren(Jane Fonda) who is staying at the hotel for one day to meet with her ex husband, Bill(Alan Alda).

They are meeting to discuss which of them their teenage daughter, Jenny(played by the troubled child actress, Dana Plato) will stay with for the majority of the year.

As they discuss their daughter, the pair quickly fall back into their old arguments and sniping. I think that Jane Fonda delivers one of her best performances here, as the strong woman trying desperately hard to hide how scared and worried she really is.

Photo1357
Jane Fonda as Hannah. Screenshot by me.

Watch her face during the arguments with Alan Alda, she says so much with her expressions alone and conveys to us how she can’t afford to let her tough mask slip for a second.

I think this story is the most poignant and relatable out of the four. I can imagine anyone who has been through a divorce where children have been involved will be able to relate to at least some moments in this one. 

The dialogue in this story is very funny and sharp. The trouble is though that much of the dialogue is the sort that you just never hear in real life. I think that the use of such dialogue ends up taking you out of the film, because it comes across as contrived, even if it is very funny and clever.

The good performances by Alan Alda and Jane Fonda keep me interested and invested in this story. There are also some beautiful locations featured in this story that I really enjoy looking at.  

While I do like the film quite a bit, I do think that it is one which is a bit hit and miss. Neil Simon’s dialogue is hilarious throughout, but some of the dialogue does come across as being very contrived. Most of the characters aren’t very well developed either, which means that we don’t really care about them that much. The performances in all of the four stories more than make up for these issues though.

A few fun facts about the film. 

  • Maggie Smith would ironically end up winning the Best Supporting Actress Oscar for her performance here as an insecure actress. While I do like her performance here, it is far from one of her very best screen performances. Is her performance really Oscar worthy? It’s good, but I don’t think it was Oscar worthy at all.

 

  • Eagle eyed viewers will spot James Coburn. He is playing Diana’s co-star in the film she is up for an Oscar for. A clip featuring James and Maggie plays in the scene on the plane at the beginning of the film. 

 

  • The scene where Diana and Sidney arrive at the Oscars was actually filmed at the real 50th Oscars ceremony, which was held in April,1978. 

 

  • The hotel featured in the film is the Beverly Hills Hotel. Large numbers of celebrities have stayed at the hotel over the years. The actor Peter Finch suffered a fatal heart attack in the lobby of the hotel, in January, 1977.

 

What do you think of the film? Which of the stories is your favourite?

 

Uncategorized

The James Mason Blogathon Concludes

James Mason 3

A massive belated thank you to everyone who took part in this blogathon last weekend. It is lovely to see so much love for James Mason and his films.

Apologies for not being very present on the blogathon days, and for not having been able to comment on your posts yet. I have a chronic health condition, and unfortunately I have been quite ill because of it over the last few weeks.

I am looking forward to reading all your articles and commenting on them. I hope you all had fun on the blogathon days and enjoyed writing and reading articles.

Thanks again.

Uncategorized

The James Mason Blogathon Begins

James Mason 2

The big event has finally arrived! Over the next two days, some truly wonderful classic film bloggers will be submitting their articles and reviews about the life and career of James Mason.

Keep checking back to this post over the next couple of days. I’ll be updating this post as the entries come in.

Message dated 06.10.2018. Hello everyone. Please forgive me for not stopping by and leaving you any comments on your sites at the moment. I am not well( a chronic health condition), and I don’t have the strength to be on here much at the moment. I promise that I’ll visit all your sites as soon as I can. 

 

Day 2 Entries

 

Critica Retro tells us about the time James starred alongside Barbara Bel Geddes in Caught.

 

Musings Of A Classic Film Addict writes about a little known film called The Seventh Veil.

 

Retro Movie Buff writes about the beautiful film Pandora And The Flying Dutchman.

 

Diary Of A Movie Maniac discusses James’s creepy performance in the miniseries Salem’s Lot.

 

MovieRob tells us about the second time that James played Rommel on screen, in the film The Desert Rats.

 

Dubism shares his thoughts on Odd Man Out.

 

Poppity Talks Classic Films discusses the controversial film Lolita.

 

Reelweegiemidgetreviews shares her thoughts on James’s performance in Heaven Can Wait.

 

James Mason 1

Day 1 Entries

Silver Screenings is the first to the party, and she shares her review of The Reckless Moment with us all.

 

Phyllis Loves Classic Movies tells us about the time that James starred alongside Moira Shearer in A Story Of Three Loves.

 

The Stop Button shares his thoughts on the James Mason film Bigger Than Life.

 

Caftan Woman tells us all about Five Fingers, a film inspired by real events.

 

The Midnite Drive -In discusses The Boys From Brazil.

 

Dubism shares the hidden sports analogies of A Star Is Born with us. 

 

Palewriter2 tells us about the time James played a Highwayman in The Wicked Lady.

 

MovieRob takes a look at James’s portrayal of Field Marshal Rommel in The Desert Fox: The Story Of Rommel.

 

Wide Screen World reviews Heaven Can Wait.

 

Silver Scenes writes about the beautiful and haunting film Pandora And The Flying Dutchman.

 

I write about my three favourite James Mason film performances.

 

Uncategorized

The James Mason Blogathon: My Three Favourite James Mason Performances

James Mason 3

James Mason was one of the finest actors of his generation. He could play chilling villains, decent and gentle heroes, and complex and intriguing characters. His brooding and intense expressions coupled with that voice of his made him quite the screen presence indeed. 

I would like to share my three favourite screen performances from James Mason. The films are all excellent too, and I recommend them all to anyone who hasn’t seen them before. 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea and Pandora And The Flying Dutchman are two of my favourite films of all time. 

 

Pandora And The Flying Dutchman(1951)

In this haunting and poetic love story, James plays Hendrick van der Zee, a cursed man who is doomed to live in the world for all eternity. He must live onboard the vessel known as the Flying Dutchman. He can break free of his curse, but only if he finds a woman who loves him so much that she will willingly die for him.

Photo1377
James as Hendrick. Screenshot by me.

James is terrific in this role. He conveys the tenderness and longing his character feels for the woman he loves, and also the fear of getting too close to her, as he doesn’t want her to die if she is the woman who could break his curse. He also convinces in the scene where we see the moment of jealousy and madness that led him to be cursed in the first place.

James has this otherworldly air about him in this, and this aura really helps us buy into him being a man who has walked the earth for centuries. He and Ava Gardner manage to convince us that their characters souls are calling out to one another. 

The monologue James delivers during the flashback sequence is truly a performance for the ages. This is a film that I return to again, and again, and again. James Mason’s performance plays a major part in my love for this one.

 

 

20,000 Leagues Under The Sea (1954)

This was the first film that I ever saw James Mason in. Every single time I watch this film, I am always struck most by how complex and intriguing James managed to make Captain Nemo.

Photo1376
James as Captain Nemo. Screenshot by me.

At times James makes Nemo frightening and intense. At other moments he allows us to see this man’s inner torment and hopes, and we really sympathise with him and admire him .

I have never seen any other actor play this character quite like James Mason did. James really managed to capture the varied facets of Nemo’s tormented soul. It is a remarkable performance, and it is one that is still highly fascinating and powerful when viewed today. The film is cracking too!

 

 

Bigger Than Life (1956)

James plays Ed Avery, a middle aged teacher who becomes addicted to some prescribed medication. His entire personality changes due to the effects of the drug. He goes from being a loving, warm and gentle husband and father, to becoming a tyrannical brute. His family become afraid of him and he won’t listen to the advice from anyone around him. 

Photo1325
James as Ed. Screenshot by me.

If you want to see what a good actor James Mason was, then this film is one that you should check out. His performance here really is extraordinary. At times he makes us  despise Ed for his actions brought on by the medication, and yet at other times he makes our hearts break with his plight.

James does a terrific job of conveying Ed’s pain, fear and uncontrollable behaviour to us. It’s one of his best screen performances as far as I’m concerned. I never get tired of watching this film and enjoying James Mason’s magnificent performance in it.

 

What do you think of James Mason’s performances in these films? What are your favourite performances from him?

Uncategorized

The Deborah Kerr Blogathon Concludes + Another Post

Deborah banner 3

Thank you so much for joining me to celebrate this fabulous actress. Your reviews and articles have made it very clear just how much Deborah is still loved and admired today.

Please stop by and read Pop Culture Reverie’s post on Tea And Sympathy. This post was published just a few hours ago.

Thank you to everyone who took part. 

James Mason 3

 

I look forward to seeing as many of you as possible this Friday and Saturday, as I host my next blogathon to celebrate James Mason.

You can learn more and sign up here.

 

 

 

 

Uncategorized

The Deborah Kerr Blogathon Begins

Deborah banner 1

The big day has finally arrived! Today is the day that we all come together to discuss the life and career of the great Deborah Kerr.

Today is also special, because if she had still been with us, Deborah would have been celebrating her birthday today. Happy Birthday, Deborah. You are missed by classic film fans the world over.

A number of truly wonderful bloggers have penned reviews and articles about Deborah and her films. Thank you so much for joining me to celebrate Deborah Kerr.

Check back to this post throughout the day. I will be linking back to all the articles as they come in. Happy reading. 

 

Deborah banner 3

The Entries

Palewriter2 starts the Deborah Kerr celebrations off. She shares her love for the romantic weepie An Affair To Remember. She also discusses Deborah’s three remarkable performances in The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp.

 

The Lady Eve’s Reel Life takes us on a frightening journey, as she discusses Deborah’s performance in the terrifying horror film The Innocents

 

Critica Retro writes about the time that Deborah starred alongside Robert Donat, in the romantic War drama Perfect Strangers.

 

Musings Of A Classic Film Addict visits Deborah for some Tea And Sympathy

 

The Stop Button discusses the hotel set drama Separate Tables.

 

Caftan Woman tells us all about Reunion At Fairborough, which was the final film that Deborah and Robert Mitchum worked on together. 

 

Movie Rob discusses Deborah’s performance in Edward My Son.

 

Poppity Talks Classic Film shares her opinions about Black Narcissus

 

Diary Of A Movie Maniac shares his thoughts on The End Of The Affair and Beloved Infidel.

 

Anybody Got A Match discusses The Hucksters, which was one of Deborah’s earlier films.

 

The Story Enthusiast tells us about the time Deborah joined Ava Gardner and Richard Burton for The Night Of The Iguana

 

Phyllis Loves Classic Movies discusses a selection of Deborah Kerr’s films.

 

I write about the Four Essential Deborah Kerr Performances . I also join Deborah and Robert Mitchum on a Pacific island in Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison.

 

Uncategorized

The Deborah Kerr Blogathon: Four Essential Deborah Kerr Performances

 

Deborah banner 2Deborah Kerr delivered so many excellent performances during her long film career. She was always such a natural film actress, and she always oozed such class.

I’ve chosen four of her films which I think all highlight what a gifted actress she was. 

I think that all four of these films make for essential viewing if you want to see Deborah’s range as an actress. 

 

                                                             

The Innocents (1961)

I think this may well be Deborah’s best screen performance. She is so convincing here as the governess on the brink of a breakdown. She more than convinces as a terrified, paranoid and anxious Governess who believes that the two children she is looking after are possessed by the ghosts of two dead former servants. 

Photo1248
Deborah in The Innocents. Screenshot by me.

Is she really seeing ghosts and uncovering a case of possession? Or is she going mad and imagining the frightening things she starts to see?   

Deborah really lets us in to this woman’s psyche. Thanks to her very convincing performance, we really feel her characters fear build up throughout the film.  This film offered Deborah a chance to play someone very different from the kind, glamorous, elegant and confident characters that she so often played on screen.

 

The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp (1943)

In this Powell and Pressburger classic, Deborah doesn’t just play one character, she plays THREE characters. Although we are well aware that it is Deborah playing each character, her terrific performances convince us that these characters are three very different women in terms of their personalities and mannerisms.  

                            Deborah as Edith, Barbara and Johnny. Screenshot by me.

Deborah plays Edith, Barbara and Johnny. Edith is a British woman living in Germany. Major Clive Candy(Roger Livesey)falls in love with her. Edith marries his German friend, Theo(Anton Walbrook). Clive never stops loving her.

A few years later, Clive meets a WW1 nurse called Barbara, a woman who bears an uncanny resemblence to his lost love. The pair get married. In a way their marriage means that Clive has Edith back in his life. Clive’s chauffeur during WW2  is a young woman known as Johnny, she also reminds him of Edith. Johnny is someone who is much more open and easier to get to know than either Edith or Barbara.

I think that Deborah’s three performances in this are essential viewing if you are a fan of her work.  

                                              

 From Here To Eternity (1953)

Although it is best remembered for that risque roll in the surf, this film is also notable for featuring Deborah playing very much against type. Up to this point in her career she had mostly been playing prim, innocent and respectable women on the screen. 

Photo1274
Deborah as Karen. Screenshot by me.

In this film, her famous red hair is dyed blonde, and her character, Karen Holmes, is a very sexualised and strong-willed woman. Karen is also very forward and isn’t shy about making her desires and needs known to others. 

Deborah owns every second of film she appears in here. Her performance and look in the film remind me so much of Rita Hayworth’s in The Lady From Shanghai.  

There’s so much more to Deborah’s performance in this one than merely being sexy though. She also very adeptly conveys Karen’s deep vulnerability, her toughness and her strength. It really is a remarkable performance.

 

Black Narcisuss(1947)

Another Powell and Pressburger masterpiece. This film sees Deborah playing Sister Clodagh, the newly promoted head nun in a convent. The nuns move out to a new convent in the Himalayas. Not long after they arrive at their new home, they all quickly start to crack under stress, and begin to give in to different desires and wishes which have long been repressed. 

Photo1275
Deborah as Sister Clodagh. Screenshot by me.

Deborah does such a wonderful job of conveying to us her characters very difficult emotional struggle and her waning strength. Her performance here is subtle and all in the eyes.  Deborah’s face is a kaleidoscope of emotion here. 

 

What are your thoughts on Deborah’s performances in these four films?

 

Uncategorized

The Deborah Kerr Blogathon: Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison(1957)

Deborah banner 3

I don’t know about anyone else out there, but I really love watching films focusing on two very different characters who get thrown together by chance. I love watching such characters work to overcome their differences, and in the process of doing so slowly begin to like and trust one another.

The most famous example of this type of film has to be John Huston’s The African Queen (1951). I like that film quite a bit, but despite my fondness for it, the film has never been able to claim the place in my heart which is held by Huston’s later film Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison. I find that I care far more about Deborah Kerr and Robert Mitchum’s characters, than I have ever cared about Bogie and Hepburn’s characters in The African Queen.

I also like Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison more because I think that it is the more serious and touching film of the two. The film is part war film and part romantic drama. The film also features a good mix of action, suspense, drama and comedy. 

Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison is based upon the 1952 novel of the same name by Charles Shaw. John Huston co-wrote the screenplay for this film with John Lee Mahin. The film was shot on location on the islands of Trinidad and Tobago.  

The film is set in the Pacific during WW2. The story begins with an American Marine, Corporal Allison(Robert Mitchum)floating on the ocean in a life raft. He has become separated from his comrades during a naval battle. The corporal’s raft washes up on the beach of a remote island in the South Pacific. 

                      The first meeting between the Marine and the Nun. Screenshot by me.

While he is walking around exploring the island, he comes across a small building and he is astonished to discover that it is occupied by a Catholic nun called Sister Angela(Deborah Kerr). Only after he has been assured that she is well and in no danger, does the corporal lie down and take a well deserved sleep. What a gent he is! 🙂  

Sister Angela is alone on the island, she has only been living there for a few days herself. She has been alone since the death of the priest she was working with a few days earlier. The pair had been taken to the island by some natives to help evacuate another priest who lived on the island.

When Sister Angela and the priest had arrived on the island, they soon discovered that the other priest had already been removed by Japanese forces, and then they were stranded there when the natives who brought them over got frightened and abandoned them. 

Photo1344
Sister Angela and Corporal Allison have a talk. Screenshot by me.

Sister Angela and Corporal Allison are hesitant of one another at first, but as they spend more time together they begin to start liking each other very much.

The Corporal’s feelings deepen into romantic love and he tells Sister Angela that he wants to marry her, so that he can take care of her forever.

We can see that the pair like one another very much, but Sister Angela, in a firm but very gentle way, makes it quite clear to Corporal Allison that she has devoted herself to serving God and that she will never marry or have physical relations.

Corporal Allison struggles to get his head around her decision to never allow herself romantic love. This leads him to deliver this funny and touching outburst: “If ya gotta be a nun, why ain’t ya old and ugly? Why do ya gotta have big blue eyes, a beautiful smile and freckles?”

I find Corporal Allison’s outburst to be very moving because we have seen him pluck up the courage to express his feelings to her, and he feels hurt and embarrassed that he has opened himself up like that only to be rejected. She is kind to him afterwards and they both try not to let things get awkward after that declaration of love and longing. 

Photo1345
Corporal Allison carries Sister Angela after she falls ill. Screenshot by me.

Things are further complicated when Japanese forces land on the island. The Corporal must try and protect the two of them from the Japanese soldiers who are moving around the island.

Later in the film the Corporal must do all he can to save the life of Sister Angela when she becomes seriously ill with a fever. 

As the film goes on Sister Angela slowly begins to leave her rather naive belief that all humans are good far behind her. Sister Angela begins to understand and accept the darker and harsher realities of life. She may not approve of Corporal Allison killing people, but she understands that his actions are necessary for their survival.

With the Pacific war going on around her, Sister Angela is also becoming more aware of the evil acts that humans are capable of. She never loses her belief and hope that people can change their ways and become more decent, the time she spends with Corporal Allison proves to her that people are capable of changing for the better. 

Corporal Allison in turn tries to alter his behaviour and manners so that he doesn’t offend or upset Sister Angela. He starts out as a very gruff and blunt man, yet as the film goes on he becomes a much gentler and thoughtful man. Through spending time with Sister Angela he also begins to see that not all human beings are cruel and out for whatever they can get.

By the end of the film Corporal Allison has become a very different person than the one we saw at the beginning. He may well not be able to give up his life in the corp(which is all he has ever known), but I have a strong suspicion that he will be a very different person with a very different outlook on life when he returns home.

Sister Angela and Corporal Allison can go back into society at the end of the film, with each of them having acquired a far better understanding of the human condition than they had before they encountered one another. 

Interestingly the film also shows us that Corporal Allison and Sister Angela are both similarly devoted to the institutions they each belong to (Sister Angela to the Catholic Church, and Corporal Allison to the United States Marine Corps), and that both of these institutions are somewhat similar, both in terms of their rituals and traditions, and also because of how people involved with both institutions devote themselves to living that way of life.

Photo1352
Deborah Kerr as Sister Angela. Screenshot by me.

The performance of Deborah in Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison is amazing. She totally convinces as Sister Angela. She radiates decency and warmth.

Deborah also has an innocence and sweetness about her in this which I think perfectly contrasts with the rugged, world-weary personality of Robert’s stranded Marine.

Deborah is particularly excellent in the scene where the island is being bombed and Sister Angela is very frightened by the loud noises. She also totally convinces us that her character is seriously ill during the fever sequences. 

Photo1353
Robert Mitchum as Corporal Allison. Screenshot by me.

Robert Mitchum is equally as good as the worldly Marine. His performance here has all the toughness and don’t mess with me attitude present in so many of his Noir films, yet Robert is also at his most vulnerable here.

Robert’s performance lets you see how much the Corporal is struggling with his feelings for Sister Angela and struggling with himself as to whether he should bring his feelings out into the open. It’s one of my favourite performances from Robert. This film is said to have been his own personal favourite from his own work. 

Deborah and Robert would become good friends after working on this film. Robert had initially thought that Deborah would be very prim and proper like many of her screen characters had been. His assumptions were happily proven wrong after she swore at director John Huston during a take, this caused Robert to collapse laughing and after that the pair got on just fine. 🙂

Deborah and Robert would go on to star alongside each other in The Sundowners, The Grass Is Greener and Reunion At Fairborough(TV film). Robert Mitchum and Deborah Kerr are in my top five acting screen teams. I like them together so much because they always manage to convince us of the emotional bonds developing between their characters in their four films. 

Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison is a lovely and moving film.I highly recommend it, not only to fans of Deborah and Robert, but to anyone who appreciates a well told story with a strong focus on the characters and actors. 

My favourite scenes are the following. The corporal’s confession about his feelings for Sister Angela. The scenes where he is nursing her when she has the fever. The scene where he comforts her in the cave during the bombing. Sister Angela watching Corporal Allison standing on the beach looking out to sea. Where he tells her it has been a privilege to know her, and she says he will always be her dear companion. The scene where he sings Don’t Sit Under The Apple Tree and they dance on the beach. The scene where he is drunk.

As well as the great acting to enjoy, there are also some lovely locations to look at and there is a good score by Georges Auric to enjoy.  

Any other fans of this one? What are your thoughts on Deborah’s performance in this one?

 

 

 

 

Uncategorized

The Joseph Cotten Blogathon: Day 1

Joseph 3

The big day has finally arrived! 🙂 It’s time for us to all gather together to celebrate the life and career of Joseph Cotten.

I will be your hostess accepting the entries for today. The lovely Crystal will be your hostess for the next two days over at In The Good Old Days Of Classic Hollywood.

We are both really looking forward to reading all of your reviews and articles over the next three days. Thanks again for joining us in this celebration of Joseph Cotten and his films. Check back to this post throughout today to see the entries.

                                                                   Day 1 Entries

Cinematic Scribblings discusses Lo Scopone Scientifico, which is a lesser known film starring Joseph Cotten and Bette Davis.

Moon In Gemini tells us about the time that Joseph Cotten and Teresa Wright reunited on screen in The Steel Trap.

Mike’s Take On The Movies reviews Two Flags West, a film set during the American Civil War.

The Midnite Drive-In discusses Joseph’s performance in The Hearse

Caftan Woman discusses Joseph’s performance as a man with a shady past in Walk Softly, Stranger.

Movie Rob discusses the chilling Soylent Green.

Wide Screen World watches The Farmer’s Daughter for the first time.

Popcorn and Flickers writes about Joseph’s debut performance in Too Much Johnson.

The Stop Button discusses the 1944 version of Gaslight.

Down These Mean Streets takes a trip into the shadows to review The Third Man.

Dubism discusses the sports analogies hidden in Tora!Tora!Tora!

I share my three favourite Joseph Cotten film performances.

Blogathons

The Joseph Cotten Blogathon: My Three Favourite Joseph Cotten Film Performances

Joseph 3This is my entry for the Joseph Cotten blogathon being co-hosted by myself and Crystal in a few days time. I can’t wait to read all of your entries. 

Joseph Cotten is a great favourite of mine. I like how he could easily switch between playing very likeable and easy going characters, and characters who were more darker and difficult to understand. 

Joseph was one of the most reliable and popular American classic era actors.  He was very good friends with Orson Welles, and it is Orson who we have to thank for Joseph becoming a film actor in the first place.It was also Orson Welles who gave Joseph his start in films. 

Joseph started out working alongside Orson in the Mercury Theatre. The Mercury Theatre was Orson’s independent theatre, radio, and film company, which he had co-founded with John Houseman in 1937. 

Joseph first appeared on screen when he starred in Too Much Johnson(1938), this was a film directed by Orson Wells. This was a film that was considered to be lost for decades, until it was discovered in 2013. Joseph’s next performance was as the best friend in Orson’s classic Citizen Kane. Then he went on to appear in The Magnificent Ambersons and Journey Into Fear. He would go on to become a popular and reliable actor in both film and television.

I’d like to share my three favourite Joseph Cotten film performances with you.

 

Since You Went Away (1944)

This WW2 drama is my first choice for a favourite Joseph Cotten performance. I love the film a great deal for its story and characters, but Joseph’s performance and the character he plays is what brings me back to this film again and again.

Photo1305
Joseph as Tony. Screenshot by me.

Joseph plays the decent, fun loving, dependable, charming and loveable Tony Willet. He really steals every scene he is in. Joseph plays Tony in such a way that for me he becomes the life and soul of the film. 

Tony is the best friend of Anne Hilton(Claudette Colbert)and her husband, who is away fighting in the war.

Tony is in America waiting on his orders from the Navy, when he meets up with Anne and her family and makes it his mission to cheer them all up. 

It is clear to us that Tony is in love with Anne, and that she knows it but that neither will act on it. Their relationship could so easily have turned into an affair, but I think their relationship has much more meaning and poignancy precisely because it doesn’t develop into an affair.  

Joseph conveys Tony’s love and desire for Anne so well, but he also conveys his love for his friend(Anne’s husband)too and we know that he would never damage their marriage by starting an affair with Anne. We feel sorry for Tony because he can’t get the happy ending he desires in his heart, but we love him all the more for not breaking up his friends marriage. You know he would do anything for Anne and her family and he wouldn’t ask for anything in return. What a guy! What a performance from Joseph!

 

A Shadow Of A Doubt(1943)

This was the film that forever changed Joseph’s screen image. With this role he went from playing very likeable characters, to playing a cold, manipulative and very scary serial killer.

Photo0681
Joseph as Uncle Charlie. Screenshot by me.

Joseph plays Charlie, a smooth and charming man visiting his family in a small American town. Charlie’s exterior is a mask hiding his dark true self.

He is actually a serial killer, and he is a cruel, cold and very dangerous man. When his young niece (Teresa Wright) discovers his secret, he plots to kill her too to protect his secret. 

Joseph is excellent as the dark and charming Charlie. I like how he effortlessly switches between likeable charmer and deranged and scary monster. His performance is all in his eyes and expressions and he does a terrific job. In my opinion this is Joseph Cotten’s best screen performance. 

 

I’ll Be Seeing You(1944) 

Another film set during WW2. I’ll Be Seeing You isn’t just your average romance story, this love story has some stings in the tale. In this film Joseph plays Zachary Morgan, a shell shocked soldier, who has just been released from a military hospital.

Photo1261
Joseph as Zachary. Screenshot by me.

Zachary is having a tough time dealing with his symptoms and readjusting to life on the outside. All that changes when he meets the kind Mary (Ginger Rogers).

Zachary is unaware of Mary’s secret that she is a prisoner convicted of manslaughter. Mary has been allowed out of prison for a short time to spend time with her family. 

Joseph totally convinces as a traumatised soldier struggling with his symptoms and finding a small degree of peace with the woman he is falling for. Joseph’s performance in this film is both subtle and poignant.

I especially love how Joseph conveys to us Zachary’s anxiety and awkwardness being around people and loud noises. Joseph also really makes you believe that his character is suffering and trying so very hard to get some control over his condition. 

 

What are your views on Joseph’s performances in these three films? What are your favourite Joseph Cotten performances? 

 

 

Uncategorized

Announcing The James Mason Blogathon

I’ve wanted to hold a blogathon celebrating James Mason for a while now. So I thought it was high time that I got on and put one together. He is a great favourite of mine, and as a fellow Brit, I am very proud of him for having been able to achieve international stardom.

Photo0413
James Mason in The Wicked Lady. Screenshot by me.

James Mason was one of the greatest classic era actors. He had one of the most distinctive and memorable voices in history. He was suave, brooding, intense and charming.

James Mason excelled at playing both villains and good guys. He was born in Huddersfield, West Yorkshire, on the 15th of May, 1909. He would go on to enjoy a fifty year career in film and Television. He died in 1984.

For this blogathon you can write about any of James Mason’s films and TV performances. You can write about your favourite James Mason characters. You can write a tribute to him. You can write about his career as a whole. You can write about either his British or American film career. 

You can write more than one post if you would like to do so. I will allow two duplicates per screen title. Previously published articles and reviews are very welcome.

The blogathon will be held on the 5th and 6th of October, 2018. Please publish your entries on or before those dates. 

Let me know what you want to write about in the comments section below. Check the participation list below to see who is writing about what. Take one of the banners and put them somewhere on your site to help promote the event.

Participation List

Maddy Loves Her Classic Films: Three Favourite James Mason Performances

Caftan Woman: Five Fingers

Dubism: Odd Man Out

Realweegiemidgetreviews: Heaven Can Wait

Diary Of A Movie Maniac: Salem’s Lot

Musings Of A Classic Film Addict: The Seventh Veil

Pale Writer2: The Wicked Lady

Wide Screen World: Heaven Can Wait

Poppity: Lolita

The Stop Button: Bigger Than Life

Silver Screenings: The Reckless Moment

In The Good Old Days Of Classic Hollywood: North By Northwest

MovieRob: The Desert FoxThe Desert Rats

The Wonderful World Of Cinema: James Mason and Margaret Lockwood

Phyllis Loves Classic Movies: The Story Of Three Loves

Critica Retro: Caught

Retro Movie Buff: Pandora And The Flying Dutchman

The Midnite Drive-In: The Boys From Brazil

Silver Scenes: Pandora And The Flying Dutchman

James Mason 3

James Mason 1

 

James Mason 2

Uncategorized

Announcing The Deborah Kerr Blogathon

Deborah banner 3

Deborah Kerr is one of my favourite actresses from the classic film era, and I want to hold this blogathon to celebrate Deborah and her films. I do hope that you can all join me to pay tribute to this very talented lady.

Deborah Kerr was born Deborah Jane Kerr- Trimmer, in Glasgow, on the 30th of September, 1921. She would go on to become one of the most beloved and famous actresses of her day, and she worked in both English and American films. On screen she was the epitome of an English rose. 

For this blogathon you can write about any of the films and TV series that she appeared in. You can write about her entire career. You can write a tribute to her. You can write about your favourite Deborah Kerr characters and performances. If you ever met or corresponded with her, then you can write about that experience too.

You can write more than one post if you want to. Previously published posts are very welcome. I will accept two duplicate posts per screen title. 

The blogathon will be held on the 30th of September, 2018. Please post your entries on or before this date. 

Let me know below what you want to write about. Please take one of the banners and put it on your site somewhere to help promote the event. Check the participation list below to see who is writing about what. 

Participation List

Maddy Loves Her Classic Films:  Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison & Four Essential Deborah Kerr Performances

Poppity: Black Narcissus

Caftan Woman: Reunion At Fairborough

Anybody Got A Match: The Hucksters

Musings Of A Classic Film Addict: Tea and Sympathy

The Stop Button: Separate Tables

Old Hollywood Films: The Grass Is Greener

                                         Silver Screen Classics: The Night Of The Iguana

Whimsically Classic: From Here To Eternity

Pop Culture Reverie: Tea And Sympathy

The Wonderful World Of Cinema: Separate Tables

Palewriter2: An Affair To Remember & The Life And Death Of Colonel Blimp

MovieRob: Edward My Son

Critica Retro: Vacation From Marriage

Diary Of A Movie Maniac: The End Of The Affair & Beloved Infidel

 Lady Eve’s Reel Life: The Innocents

Phyllis Loves Classic Movies: The films of Deborah Kerr

Deborah banner 1

Deborah banner 3

Deborah banner 2

Uncategorized

The David Lean Blogathon Begins

David Lean 3.PNGThe big day has finally arrived! Over the next two days, several truly wonderful bloggers are going to be submitting their reviews and articles about David Lean’s films.

A big thank you to all of you for joining me for this blogathon.I can’t wait to read all of the entries celebrating the life and career of this gifted director.

Check back to this post over the next two days as I update it to link back to all of the entries. 

 

Day 2 Entries

Silver Screen Classics writes about the epic romance Doctor Zhivago

 

Cinematic Scribblings takes a look at Lean’s family saga This Happy Breed.

 

Retromoviebuff discusses Lean’s spooky and funny film Blithe Spirit.

 

Movierob heads to Venice with David Lean’s Summertime.

 

Vinnieh talks about his love for the epic David Lean film Doctor Zhivago.

 

Cinema Essentials writes about the man himself in Director Profile: David Lean.

 

Poppity shares her love for the underrated Ryan’s Daughter. She also writes about one of David Lean’s lesser known films Madeleine.

 

Day 1 Entries

Realweegiemidgetreviews takes a look at the trailer for Lean’s epic film Doctor Zhivago. She also looks at Lean’s WW2 set classic The Bridge On The River Kwai.

 

Movierob shares his thoughts after a first time viewing of The Passionate Friends.

 

Poppity takes a look at Lean’s charming film Hobson’s Choice.

 

Caftan Woman discusses one of the greatest of David Lean’s films Great Expectations.

 

The Stop Button shares his thoughts on Lean’s aviation drama The Sound Barrier.

 

The Wonderful World Of Cinema discusses Lean’s masterpiece Lawrence Of Arabia.

 

I discuss David Lean’s stunning adaptation of Charles Dickens classic story Oliver Twist.

Uncategorized

The Second Annual Alfred Hitchcock Blogathon Begins

Hitchcock Blogathon 3

The Second Annual Alfred Hitchcock Blogathon has finally arrived!

Over the next two days, a large number of truly wonderful bloggers will be submitting their articles on all things Hitch.  Check back to this post today and tomorrow, I will be updating it as regularly as I can linking to all of the entries.

I can’t wait to read all of your posts. Thank you so much for taking part.

The Second Annual Alfred Hitchcock Blogathon participants gather together in the hotel lounge. The strains of Bernard Herrmann’s music can be heard floating through the air.

Someone kindly informs us that lunch is now ready. We all tuck into a delicious buffet, this is laid out for us on top of a suspicious looking chest belonging to some guy called Brandon.

Hitchcock blogathon 4 

Day 2 Entries

The Wonderful World Of Cinema goes out to sea in order to discuss Hitchcock’s ocean set thriller Lifeboat

 

Poppity flees from crop dusters as she reviews the Hitchcock classic North By Northwest.

 

Silver Screen Classics goes on a journey with Richard Hannay to uncover the mystery of The 39 Steps.

 

Vinnieh tells us what happened when Uncle Charlie came to town in Shadow Of A Doubt.

 

Taking Up Room discusses an early film which would become the only film of Hitchcock’s that he would ever remake. The film is  The Man Who Knew Too Much

 

Cracked Rear Viewer discusses the suspenseful 3D Hitchcock film Dial M For Murder.

 

Sat In Your Lap discusses the powerful Hitchcock film The Wrong Man

 

Pure Entertainment Preservation Society discusses the haunting and suspenseful film Rebecca

 

Retro Movie Buff encounters spies and windmills in her review of Foreign Correspondent.

 

 

Day 1 Entries

Down These Mean Streets spent some time with Devlin, Alicia and Alexander, and she writes about that experience in her review of Notorious

 

Cinema Essentials discusses Hitchcock’s suspenseful 3D film Dial M For Murder.

 

The Midnite-Drive In discusses the terrifying 60’s shocker Psycho and also the biopic Hitchcock. 

 

Wolffian Classics Movies Digest joins Jimmy Stewart and Grace Kelly to look out at the Rear Window

 

Realweegiemidgetreviews discusses Four O’ Clock, a Hitchcock directed episode of the TV series Suspicion.

 

Silver Screenings joins a party hiding a grisly secret in Rope.   

 

Bonnywood Manor gets caught up in the thrilling spy story Topaz.

 

Caftan Woman invites us all to join her at the theatre to discuss Stage Fright.

 

The Stop Button takes a look at one of Hitchcock’s early British films Young And Innocent.

 

dbmoviesblog takes a trip to Bodega Bay and witnesses nature striking back in The Birds.

 

Taking Up Room tells us all about Hitchcock’s first ever sound film Blackmail.

 

Cary Grant Won’t Eat You talks about the disappointing Hitchcock film Torn Curtain.

 

Sparks From A Combustible Mind discusses the time when Hitchcock went comic in The Trouble With Harry.

 

I take a trip to Manderley to meet Rebecca.  I also write about the 60th anniversary of the release of  Vertigo

Uncategorized

Announcing The Joseph Cotten Blogathon

Crystal from In the Good Old Days Of Classic Movies has asked me to co-host this blogathon with her. I was delighted to accept her invitation to be co-host. I really hope that you will all be able to join us both as we celebrate the life and career of the hugely talented classic film era actor, Joseph Cotten.

For this blogathon you can write about any of Joseph’s films. You can write about him as an actor. You can write about your favourite Joseph Cotten performances and screen characters. You can write more than one entry if you want to.

We will be accepting two duplicates per screen title, but no more than this as he made so many films, so there is lots for you to choose from.

The blogathon will be held on the  5th, 6th and 7th of September, 2018. There will also be a wrap up post held on the 8th. We picked these dates because September 5th marks the 77th anniversary of the release of Citizen Kane, which is one of Joseph’s most famous films.

I will be hosting on the 5th, and Crystal will be hosting on the 6th and 7th. Let one or both of us know what you would like to write about. 

Please check the particiaption list below to see who is writing about what. Please take one of the banners and pop it on your site somewhere to help to promote the event.

Participation List

In The Good Old Days Of Classic Hollywood: Portrait Of Jennie

Maddy Loves Her Classic Films: My three favourite Joseph Cotten performances

Lifesdailylessonsblog: The Killer Is Loose

Love Letters To Old Hollywood: Love Letters

Cinematic Scribblings: Lo Scopone Scientifico 

Caftan Woman: Walk Softly Stranger

Are You Thrilled: Niagara

Realweegiemidgetreviews:  Dead Weight(episode of Alfred Hitchcock Presents)

The Wonderful World Of Cinema: An ABC Of Joseph Cotten

Musings Of A Classic Film Addict: Lydia

Down These Mean Streets: The Third Man

Taking Up Room: Citizen Kane and Joseph and the Mercury Theatre

Anybody Got A Match?: Shadow Of A Doubt

The Midnite Drive-In: The Hearse

The Dream Book Blog: A Delicate Balance

Popcorn and Flickers: Too Much Johnson

Dubism: Tora, Tora, Tora: The Attack On Pearl Harbor

The Stop Button: Gaslight

Karavansara: Journey Into Fear

Wide Screen World: The Farmer’s Daughter

I Found It At The Movies: Topic to be decided

A Shroud Of Thoughts: Shadow Of A Doubt

MovieRobBlueprint For Murder, The Oscar and Soylent Green

Mike’s Take On The Movies: Two Flags West

Back To Golden Days: Since You Went Away

Critica Retro: I’ll Be Seeing You

Old Hollywood Films: Duel In The Sun

Moon In Gemini: The Steel Trap

Blogie and Bacall: Joseph Cotten as an actor

Poppity: Under Capricorn

Hamlette The Dame: Gaslight

 

Joseph 2

Joseph 3

Joseph 3

 

Uncategorized

Announcing The World War One On Film Blogathon

This year is the centenary of the end of WW1. The horror and immense slaughter of the trenches has been the focus of many films and TV series over the years. I wanted to mark the real life anniversary of the end of this war by getting us all to write about the many depictions of WW1 found on screen. 

For this blogathon you can write about any feature film, TV film, TV episode, or documentary which focuses on WW1. Films, series and documentaries from any era are very welcome.

You can write about films or series set on the battlefield. You can write about films and series focusing on soldiers,sailors, pilots and medics. You can write about films and series focusing on soldiers coming home from the war and dealing with their injuries and shell shock. You can write about films and series taking place on the homefront during this time.

The blogathon will be held on the 10th and 11th of November, 2018. Please post your entries on either of those two days. You are very welcome to post your entries early too. I will accept two duplicate posts per screen title.

You can write more than one post if you want to. Previously published articles and reviews are welcome too.

Please check the participation list below to see who is writing about what. Please take the banner below and pop it on your site somewhere to help advertise the event.

Participation List

Maddy Loves Her Classic Films: Maddy’s Five Favourite WW1 Films

Lifesdailylessonsblog: Gallipoli

Realweegiemidgetreviews: My Boy Jack

Cinematic Scribblings: The Spy In Black and The Green Room

Down These Mean Streets: Waterloo Bridge(1940)

Movie Movie Blog Blog: Wings

Caftan Woman: Broken Lullaby

The Stop Button: The Life and Death Of Colonel Blimp

Silver Screen Classics: Gallipoli

Dubism: Sergeant York and Paths Of Glory

The Wonderful World Of Cinema: Au revoir la-haut

Silver Screenings: Shoulder Arms

Thoughts All Sorts: Der Rote Baron

Movierob: The Blue Max and The Fighting 69th

Wads Words: The Big Parade

Silent-ology:  Soldier Man

Sat In Your Lap:  Heroes For Sale

Pop Culture Reverie: Wonder Woman

18 Cinema Lane: Sgt Stubby: Lawrence Of Arabia

Back To Golden Days: All Quiet On The Western Front & The Dawn Patrol

Critica Retro: J’Accuse

Pleasant Street: Lady Chatterley’s Lover

WW1 banner 1

Blogathons

Alfred Hitchcock Blogathon 2017: The Lady Vanishes (1938)

Hitchcock blogathon EvaEva over at Classicsandcraziness is hosting this blogathon all about Alfred Hitchcock. Be sure to visit her site to read all the other entries. I can’t wait to read them all myself.

I’ve recently just finished hosting my own Hitchcock blogathon, and when I saw that Eva was also hosting one, well I just couldn’t pass up on the opportunity to carry on writing about Hitch’s films.

Photo1121
A few of the main characters. Screenshot by me.

I’m writing this time about The Lady Vanishes, which is one of Hitch’s British films, and was actually the last film that he made here in the UK until he returned here in the 1970’s to make Frenzy.  

The Lady Vanishes is a Hitch film that I love a great deal. It is an excellent mystery thriller, has a nice blend of genres within it, and has lots of humour thrown into the mix as well.

There’s also lots of fun to be had in watching a romantic relationship slowly develop between a couple who at first can’t stand each other one bit. This is also a film in which you should never take the characters at face value, more than a few of them will surprise you as the film goes on.I also really like how this film doesn’t waste a single moment, and it really manages to pack quite a bit into an hour and a half of running time.

Fans of the comic, cricket obsessed characters Charters and Caldicott are also in for a treat. The duo feature here in fairly major roles ,in what was to be the first screen outing for them. These characters popped up in many British films throughout the 1940’s. 

Photo1120
Michael Redgrave and Margaret Lockwood as Gilbert and Iris. Screenshot by me.

The lead actors of the film are Margaret Lockwood and Michael Redgrave, they would both soon go on to become very popular stars in British cinema. Here though they are both in the very early stages of their respective careers, you’d never guess that this was only Michael’s first screen appearance, or that Margaret had only been acting on screen herself for only around five years. They are both excellent and come across very natural in their performances.

Iris (Margaret Lockwood)is on a walking holiday in Europe with two of her friends. Iris is returning home to the UK before her friends do. When she gets home she will soon be getting married. About to board her homebound train, Iris is hit on the head by a heavy plant pot that falls from a window above her. Iris has a very sore head but seems to be fine otherwise.

Photo1119
Miss Froy. Screenshot by me.

Iris is befriended by Miss Froy (Dame May Whitty), an elderly governess who is also returning home to the UK. During the journey Miss Froy looks after the injured Iris, who falls asleep and when she wakes up Miss Froy is missing. Fellow passengers and train staff claim she was never on the train!

Fellow passenger, Dr. Hartz (Paul Lukas)is concerned that Iris’s head injury could be causing her to hallucinate, but Iris is adamant that she is telling the truth and that Miss Froy was no hallucination.

Photo1116
Gilbert and Iris go searching on the train. Screenshot by me.

The only one who believes her is the witty musician, Gilbert (Michael Redgrave)who had met and annoyed Iris the night before at her hotel (he was playing music loudly and this disturbed her sleep.)

Can Gilbert and Iris stop bickering long enough to get to the bottom of what is going on? Just what has happened to the little old lady dressed all in tweed?

Margaret is excellent as the woman who is thrown into danger and adventure, but who won’t back down in her search for her friend. She makes you really feel her mounting confusion and desperation, particularly as it seems more and more likely that she imagined the missing old lady.

Michael steals every scene he is in as the dashing, heroic and witty Gilbert. I love how he conveys to us by the way he looks at Iris that he is falling hard for her. Michael looks at Margaret with such tenderness (I’m swooning just writing this 🙂 ) and you just know these two should get together. I’m really impressed by how good Michael is here considering this is his film debut. He acts like he has been in front of a camera for years before this.

Paul Lukas is excellent as the respectable surgeon who may or may not be hiding a secret. Paul has your attention in every scene he is in. Is his character one to be trusted?

Dame May Whitty is perfect casting as the little old lady, who as it later turns out has quite a few surprises up her sleeve.

Photo1117
Charters and Caldicott. Screenshot by me.

Naunton Wayne and Basil Radford are hysterical as the friends to whom nothing else matters apart from getting home to watch a cricket match. They are a riot, and it’s not difficult to see why they went on to appear in many films over the next few years.

Cecil Parker and Linden Travers are also both excellent as a couple who are having an affair. They may have seen Miss Froy, but refuse to get involved as they don’t want to draw attention to themselves.

Googie Withers who(like Margaret Lockwood)would soon go on to become a popular leading lady of British cinema, has a small role as one of Iris’s friends.

My favourite scenes are the following. Gilbert and Iris’s first meeting at the hotel. Gilbert climbing out of the train window as another train comes by on the opposite track. Gilbert and Iris meeting again on the train. All the scenes featuring Charters and Caldicott. The shootout finale. Gilbert and Iris finding the magicians box in the luggage compartment. Gilbert getting all worried about Iris after she faints.

In this film, a whistled tune turns out to be of vital international importance, major head trauma is somehow avoided when a heavy plant pot falls on a human head, and a packet of tea proves to be a vital clue to the whereabouts of a missing woman. There’s romance, arguments, secrets and dangers galore. You really don’t want to avoid boarding this train!

Any other fans of this film? Please leave your comments below.

 

 

 

 

Blogathons

Announcing The Horrorathon: 26th and 27th Of October, 2017

The Horrorathon 3

In a couple of months time it will be Halloween; cue the scary music, flickering candles, screams, and people banging at your door thinking it’s fine to demand sweets. A perfect opportunity then for us to discuss those films that scare us.

You can discuss anything related to horror films. For example you could discuss your favourite scary film. The Universal Monster Movies (Dracula, The Invisible Man etc.) The Hammer Horror films. The films of Val Lewton. The Horror directors. The Horror stars, such as Vincent Price, Lon Chaney Sr, Peter Cushing etc. It’s entirely up to you.

As usual, I will only be accepting two duplicate posts about the same film, actor etc. There are so many films and stars out there for this genre, that we shouldn’t all need to write about the same ones. Check the participant list below to see who is writing about what. You are welcome to write more than one post.

New to blogathons?

How do I take part?
Very easily. Leave me a comment below telling me what you want to write about.  Leave me your name and the name of your blog too. Then grab one of the banners below, and put it up somewhere on your site to help spread the word.
What will happen on the Blogathon days?
I will put up a new post on each day saying the Blogathon is going live. Leave me your name and the link to your completed entry in the comments. I will then create the link to your entry on my post.
I’ve never participated in a Blogathon before. What’s it all about?
You’re in for lots of fun then. 🙂  Blogathons are a great way of connecting with other bloggers. It’s a good way of getting more visitors to your site who may not otherwise have ever known your blog existed. I love Blogathons for the varied opinions and comments different bloggers can bring to the same subject.

It’s up to you on which of the days you make your entry live. All I ask is that nobody posts late, you can post early if you like, let me know and I will add your link in on one of the days.

Grab one of the banners below to help spread the word, and put it up on your site somewhere. Have fun writing, and please don’t scare yourselves too much!

 

Horrorathon 2.PNG

Horrorathon 1

Participation List

Maddylovesherclassicfilms – Dead Of Night

Cinematic ScribblingsSpirits of the Dead

LifesdailylessonsblogThe Haunting      13 Ghosts

Thoughts All SortsMy Reaction To Horror Films.

                                   VinniehCat People

Sparksfromacombustiblemind –  Post on Jamie Lee Curtis       Halloween (1978)

Bonnywood ManorDon’t Look Now      The Haunting of Julia

RealweegiemidgetKill Keith

Wonders In The DarkI Walked With A Zombie

Serendipitous AnachronismsThe Legend Of Hell House

In The Good Old Days Of Classic HollywoodThe Bat

dbmoviesblogLes Diaboliques

Critica RetroThe Page Of Madness

The Wonderful World Of CinemaTopic to be decided

Moody MoppetThe Raven

Old School EvilMonster Squad

Sat In Your LapComedy Of Terrors

It Came From The Man CaveTrick or Treat?

Silent-ologyThe Man Who Laughs (1928)

The Stop ButtonSuspiria

A Viewers Guide To Classic FilmsHouse Of Dracula