Tag Archives: Singin’ In The Rain

The Classics For Comfort Blogathon

The Classic Movie Blog Association is hosting this blogathon about classic era films which bring us comfort. We have been asked to share 5 of our favourite comforting classics. Be sure to visit the CMBA site to read all of the entries, I can’t wait to read them all myself.  Classics For Comfort blogathonWe all have those special films and TV series that we reach for on the shelves when we’re going through upsetting or difficult times. While there are many lovely films to be found in all decades of cinema, the classic film era has an abundance of feelgood and gentle films.

Watching a black and white romantic drama or a dazzling Technicolor musical, can often be just what the doctor ordered during tough times. There’s also nothing better than spending time with all those acting legends and memorable characters either. Watching classic era films is like spending time with old friends as far as I’m concerned. 

           Just a few of the many classics that provide comfort for me. Image source IMDb. 

In the terrifying and uncertain times which we’re living in at the moment, I think that classic era films are more important for our emotional wellbeing than they’ve ever been before. Here are five of my favourite comfort classics. I highly recommend them all to anyone who is struggling.

                                                     Paris When It Sizzles(1964)

William Holden and Audrey Hepburn reunite for the second and final time on screen to play Hollywood scriptwriter Richard Benson, and his secretary Gabrielle, who are trying to come up with potential storylines and characters for a new film. Along the way the pair fall in love. I often turn to this one when times are tough because it’s just so much fun. It’s also very romantic and is pure escapism. I love how it pokes fun at the film industry and at all those film cliches we’ve all become so familiar with. 

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Audrey and William. Image source IMDb.

My favourite part of the film is seeing Audrey and William also playing the various characters and acting out the potential storylines of Richard’s script – from a rich girl being wined and dined by a vampire, to a young woman who gets caught up with a smooth spy.  Audrey and William have amazing chemistry and the way the pair look at each other just melts my heart. This one never fails to leave me smiling after I’ve watched it. You can’t fail to be charmed by this delightful film. You can read my full review here. 

                                                    Singin’ In The Rain (1952)

One of the most joyous films ever made. If there is anyone out there who dislikes this or isn’t left feeling happy after watching it, then I for one don’t ever want to know them. I fell in love with this from the first time I ever saw it. This film is so much more than just a musical and has something in it for everyone to enjoy. I particularly love the film within a film, the songs and elaborate dance routines, the beautiful costumes, and the stunning use of Technicolor. Most of all I love the characters and the comedy.

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Gene and Debbie dress for the weather. Image source IMDb.

The whole cast are sensational, with special praise going to Gene Kelly, Jean Hagen(who steals the show as far as I’m concerned), Donald O’Connor. Cyd Charisse proves once again that she’s one of the best dancers of all time and gets one of the most unforgettable screen entrances of all time. Singin’ In The Rain not only leaves me with a big smile on my face every time I watch it, but it also makes me feel like things will get better and my days will get brighter.

                                            The Ghost And Mrs. Muir (1947)

A lonely and underappreciated widow melts the gruff and grumpy heart of a former sea Captain, and he in return gives her the love and companionship she has never received. Sure it sounds like one of those really well known and predictable romantic story plotlines, but this is a love story with a difference due to the Captain being a ghost. The growing bond and attraction between Captain Gregg and Mrs. Lucy Muir is my main reason for loving this one so much. 

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Captain Gregg and Mrs. Muir. Image source IMDb.

Bernard Herrmann’s beautiful and atmospheric score is the perfect accompaniment to the film. Gene Tierney and Rex Harrison are both terrific, and there’s the added bonus of my boy George Sanders in full charming cad mode. You can read my full review here. 

                                                     It’s Great To Be Young (1956)

I first came across this little gem while flicking through the channels on TV sometime in the early 2000’s. I had missed the beginning and had no idea what the title was or what it was about, but despite that I got so caught up in the film and absolutely loved the characters and story. The film stayed with me and it was only a few years ago that I finally discovered the title.

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Mr. Dingle and some of his students. Screenshot by me.

This is one of my favourite inspirational teacher films and a large part of why that is, is due to John Mills’s fantastic performance as History and Music teacher Mr. Dingle.

He is so passionate about teaching music and about nurturing and encouraging the students in his care. He cares about his students and takes the time to hear their troubles and try and help them. They love him and admire him greatly in return. I think Mr. Dingle is the sort of teacher all children deserve. The film is one of the earliest British teen musicals and was one of the most popular films at the British box office in 1956. It’s Great To Be Young is so much fun and always leaves me feeling as though all is right in the world, as well as putting a spring in my step.

                                                            Random Harvest(1942)

Some may think that this weepie won’t make for the most comforting of films but they would be wrong. Random Harvest is so much more than a tearjerker, it’s a film about lovely and kind people, true love, and about the lengths we will go to in order to help a loved one. It’s also one of the greatest romantic dramas of all time. I find this one comforting due to all the lovely characters, especially Paula and Smithy(Greer Garson and Roland Colman). 

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Greer and Ronald. Image source IMDb.

Paula reaches out to the shell shocked and amnesic Smithy, and in doing so shows him there is still kindness and gentleness in the world. She sees past the trauma and damage to the lonely and hurting soul beneath. She helps him to heal. He in turn is the most loving and gentle man she could ever hope to have as either a friend or a lover. Random Harvest is a film about compassion and enduring love, healing, hope and second chances. While it causes many tears to be shed, it also leaves you with a feeling of hope – hope that the lonely and ill can find love and acceptance, and that somewhere out there is the soulmate we are meant to walk through life with. 

Five Favourite Films Of The 1950’s Blogathon

50's Blogathon

Rick over at the Classic Film & TV Cafe is hosting this blogathon dedicated to our favourite 1950’s films. This blogathon is being held to mark National Classic Movie Day. Be sure to visit his site to read all of the entries, I can’t wait to read them all myself. 

I have so many favourite films from each decade of cinema, so it has been very difficult trying to pick just five films to focus on for this particular blogathon. The five films I’ve chosen are ones that I return to again and again. I love these films so much.

 

5. Ice Cold In Alex (1958)

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The four main characters in Ice Cold In Alex. Screenshot by me.

This is a tense, gritty and suspenseful drama, set during the Western Desert Campaign of WW2. The film focuses on a group of British soldiers, and two British nurses, who are travelling together in an ambulance heading for Alexandria. They must evade German patrols, while also trying to cope with the intense desert heat.

I love this film for its character focus and for the superb performances. I love the bond that develops between the characters and how they work together to survive. 

The film sucks you in and makes you feel as though you are right there struggling alongside these people. The film is also quite groundbreaking in showing John Mills’s character struggling with PTSD and alcoholism. Read my full review here. 

 

4. North By Northwest (1959)

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Cary Grant as Roger. Screenshot by me.

This Alfred Hitchcock classic never fails to have me on the edge of my seat in suspense one minute, and then laughing my head off the next. This stylish thriller is one of Hitch’s best and most enjoyable films. 

Cary Grant is at his most suave and loveable as Roger Thornhill, a man wrongly identified as someone else. This mistaken identity has him running for his life across America.

Roger gets mixed up with spies, gets chased by crop dusters, falls in love with a mysterious blonde, and dangles from the edge of Mount Rushmore. 

A great cast, interesting characters, and plenty of suspense and thrills. There is so much going on in this film. I can’t get enough of it. Shout out to Cary Grant for doing one of the funniest drunk impressions I’ve ever seen. Read my full review here. 

 

3. Heaven Knows, Mr. Allison (1957)

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Sister Angela and Corporal Allison. Screenshot by me.

Words cannot fully express how much I actually love this one. This is such a lovely and poignant film.

American Marine, Corporal Allison (Robert Mitchum), and Catholic Nun, Sister Angela(Deborah Kerr) are trapped together on a pacific island.

WW2 rages all around them and they are in danger from the Japanese forces. As they spend more time together, Corporal Allison falls in love with Sister Angela. She likes him very much too, but she will not break her vows in order to be with him romantically. When Japanese forces land on the island, Allison must do all that he can to prevent the pair being discovered. The film is a mixture of drama, romance, war, action and comedy. 

Deborah and Robert have such wonderful chemistry, they make you really care for their characters and for the difficult emotional situation they find themselves in. Robert and Deborah would go on to make three more films together and would also become good friends. The film is another wonderful character piece and does such a wonderful job of making us connect with Sister Angela and Corporal Allison. Read my full review here. 

 

2. A Night To Remember (1958)

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The Titanic sinks. Screenshot by me.

This is one of my favourite films of all time. It’s such a moving film. Hands down this is also the best film out there about the Titanic disaster. The sinking sequences are stunning and look so realistic. I think that the sequences impress just as much today as they did back in 1958.  

This film is based on Walter Lord’s non-fiction book of the same name, in which he spoke to Titanic survivors and wrote down their accounts of what happened. There is an almost documentary feel to this film. It sticks to the facts of what happened that night and how people behaved. We follow the ship from her launch, to when she struck the iceberg, and finally when she sank in the Atlantic. 

The entire cast are excellent. It’s fun to see so many familiar faces in among the cast. Kenneth More and Michael Goodliffe deliver the standout performances of the film for me. Kenneth is the Titanic’s second officer, Charles Lightoller, and Michael is the devastated shipbuilder, Thomas Andrews. Many of the scenes featuring these two are the ones that linger in my mind the most. I think that Michael in particular delivers one of the best(possibly the best)performance of his career. I have never forgotten the scene where Andrews is standing in the lounge preparing to meet his death. In that scene, Michael’s expression conveys to us that Andrews has emotionally/mentally long since left the present, and we can see that he is no longer really aware of what is going on around him. 

I never fail to cry at the scene on the stern as the ship sinks. In this scene, an old steward tries to comfort the little boy he has rescued, and the other passengers and crew try and prepare themselves for what is to come. Some people pray (a moving moment where prayers are heard being uttered in different languages)and others are struck dumb with terror and disbelief. It is one of the most powerful and unforgettable scenes in film history. Read my full review here. 

And now I am pleased to reveal my most favourite film of the 1950’s…. 

 

 

 

  1. Singin’ In The Rain (1952)
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Cyd and Gene’s famous dance. Screenshot by me.

I have no doubt that this one will be appearing on many lists today. This is one of the most(if not the most)joyous films ever made. I don’t see how it’s possible to not love this film.

Singin’ In The Rain is funny, romantic, beautiful to look at, and it features some of the best song and dance sequences ever filmed. It is also a love letter to the beauty and spectacle of Technicolor.

The film focuses on the arrival of sound at the end of the Silent era. We follow a film studio’s attempt to make a feature film as a ‘Talkie’. We also follow the beloved film actor, Don Lockwood(Gene Kelly), as he falls in love with chorus girl, Kathy Selden(Debbie Reynolds), much to the annoyance of his besotted co-star, Lina Lamont(a scene stealing Jean Hagen). Chaos ensues as a result of this relationship. 

The cast are all terrific, with Jean Hagen delivering the standout performance as the shrill Lina. It’s easy to paint Lina as the villain of the film(and to be fair she is quite mean), but I view her as a victim too. Everybody either makes fun of Lina, or controls what she can say and to whom, and she reaches a point where she has enough of that and asserts her authority as a screen Queen. I find it interesting to see Lina become stronger and more dominant as the film goes along. 

One of my favourite scenes in this film, is the rather risque dance between Gene Kelly and Cyd Charisse. It’s impossible to forget this sequence once you have watched the film. It is without a doubt one of the sexiest scenes ever put on film. 

Singin’ In The Rain is a film I turn to whenever I need some cheering up. The film never fails to do the trick. I also love the film because it encapsulates all that was good and unrivalled about the Golden Age of Hollywood filmmaking. They don’t make films like this anymore, and that is a real shame.

Please let me know your thoughts on the five films I’ve chosen. I can’t wait to take a peek at everyone else’s film selections.