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The Gothic Horror Blogathon: The Tomb Of Ligeia(1964)

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This is my first entry for my friend Gabriela’s latest blogathon, which is dedicated to all things Gothic Horror. Be sure to visit her site later this month to read all of the entries, I can’t wait to read them all myself. 

The history of Gothic Horror and Gothic Romance stretches all the way back to 1764, the year in which author Horace Walpole had his novel The Castle Of Otranto published, this novel is generally considered to be the first Gothic novel ever written. Many authors including Ann Radcliffe, Edgar Allen Poe, Matthew Lewis, Daphne Du Maurier, Mary Shelley, Clara Reeve, Emily and Charlotte Bronte all followed in Warpole’s footsteps penning dark and chilling Gothic tales over the coming centuries. 

The main tropes usually present in Gothic literature and films are mansions or castles which have dark secrets and mysteries waiting to be uncovered within their walls; a Byronic male love interest who is not what he seems, or who harbours dark or tragic secrets; and a curious and strong willed heroine who seeks to uncover the secrets and to help her troubled man. Many of the greatest Gothic stories seem to work best when their setting is the 1700’s or 1800’s, but there are later stories and films, such as Daphne Du Maurier’s Rebecca, which work just as well with a more modern setting. 

Tomb Of Ligeia

The Tomb Of Ligeia is one of my favourite Gothic Horror films. While it is certainly a creepy horror film, it is at heart a beautiful and tragic love story. I especially love how this film manages to capture the eerie atmosphere, darkness, tragedy and beauty of Edgar Allen Poe’s work, while also being a very touching love story. This has become my favourite film from the Poe cycle of films directed by Roger Corman. 

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Beware the cat guarding the grave. Screenshot by me.

In 1964, the American horror director Roger Corman was here in the UK to begin work on what would be his eighth and final screen adaptation of a story by Edgar Allen Poe. The film was The Tomb Of Ligeia, which was based upon Poe’s 1838 short story Ligeia. This story may well have been written and published before Poe’s far more famous other literary works came along, but it remains one of his darkest and most tragic tales.

           It’s hard to imagine anyone other than Vincent as Verden Fell. Screenshot by me. 

Roger would once again be reunited with Vincent Price on this film. Vincent had become Roger’s regular leading man in the previous Poe films he had made. Although much older than the character in Poe’s story, Vincent never the less suits the role of Verden Fell perfectly, and it is very difficult to imagine anyone else other than him in the role. It was very nearly the case though that Vincent wasn’t cast in the lead role. 

Both Roger Corman and screenwriter Robert Towne(later to find fame as the writer of Chinatown)were actually against Vincent taking the role due to his age. Roger Corman wanted Richard Chamberlain to take the role instead. Vincent’s casting ended up becoming a condition of the films production company AIP(American-International Pictures) in investing in the film, and so he was cast as the lead. Vincent was of course such a big name at the time, and he had become so linked to the horror genre and to these Poe films, that he was massive draw for audiences when these films were released. He also fit this material perfectly and had done so ever since he was cast in the 1946 Gothic drama Dragonwyck. He brings an emotional depth to the role of Verden Fell that I don’t think would have been there if another actor had been cast. 

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Rowena discovers Ligeia’s grave. Screenshot by me. 

British actress Elizabeth Shepherd was cast alongside Vincent, in the duel role of the bright and passionate Rowena, and the sinister and dark Ligeia. Elizabeth absolutely steals the film with her brilliant performance. The film was made on location in Britain, with a large portion of it being shot at the Castle Acre Priory in Norfolk. This film feels and looks quite different from so many of the other Corman/Poe adaptations and the location work is a big reason why in my opinion. So many of the other films in the Poe cycle were very studio bound, whereas this one gains a realism due to the location work. The film also looks different due to a great many scenes taking place outside in daylight and sunshine, but its content is no less dark and strange because of it.

“She will not rest, because she is not dead….to me. And she will not die because she willed not to die.” Verden Fell

The film tells the tragic love story of the vivacious and fearless Lady Rowena(Elizabeth Shepherd)and the brooding and mysterious Verden Fell(Vincent Price). The pair meet after Rowena breaks away from a local hunt and rides into the ruins of the abbey where Verden lives. She comes across a graveyard in the ruins, and there she finds the grave of the Lady Ligeia(also played by Elizabeth), who was Verden’s wife. 

                      Rowena and Verden first set eyes on each other. Screenshot by me.

Ligeia’s grave is guarded by her pet black cat, who lashes out at Elizabeth startling her horse and causing her to fall off and hurt herself. Verden(clad all in black and rocking a pair of sunglasses which look like the ones from the 1933 Invisible Man film) then suddenly appears and tends to the injured Rowena. We can see that as soon as they meet one another they are each drawn to the other. Rowena bears a uncanny resemblance to Ligeia, which is an added attraction for Verden. 

Verden seems absolutely grief stricken by the death of his wife. At first he reminds me somewhat of Heathcliff from Wuthering Heights with how he cannot let his wife leave his side to go to the land of the dead. Verden is constantly at Ligeia’s graveside and is convinced that she will come back to life and be with him again. As the film progresses we learn that there is a dark and terrible reason why he is acting like that, and it isn’t because of grief and love either. Sometimes Verden seems to hate Rowena and becomes afraid of her presence one minute, and then becomes deeply remorseful for his behaviour and becomes gentle and kind to her the next. 

              That time Vincent Price borrowed The Invisible Man’s shades. Screenshot by me. 

As the film goes on, Verden and Rowena fall in love and get married. Rowena soon discovers that in Verden’s home the dead do not stay dead, and that due to some strange supernatural power, the Lady Ligeia is exerting her will on Verden from beyond the grave. Rowena must find the strength to save her husband and herself, while also trying to fight against forces which are beyond both her understanding and her control. 

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Lady Rowena is one of the great heroines of Gothic cinema. Screenshot by me.

Rowena is one of the strongest Gothic heroines in my opinion. Interestingly the film version of Rowena is very different to the character in Poe’s story, in which she really has no personality and is merely there as a plot device. In the film however, Rowena is brave, strong, self-sufficient, and she has a very strong will indeed. When describing Rowena to Christopher(John Westbrook), a young man of her own class who wants to marry her, Rowena’s father(Derek Francis) says this of her: “Wilful little b***h, ain’t she? Hell to be married to I should think. Her mother certainly was… God rest her soul”. 

Rowena doesn’t conform to the docile female persona that men of the time felt their women should have. Rowena knows what she wants and goes after it. She likes to make her own decisions and she isn’t afraid of darkness and danger. She also has no interest in marrying for money or in marrying the safe and approved type of men she is so often thrown together with. Rowena sees that Verden is brooding, broken and even a little dangerous and frightening, and yet she wants to be with him because she loves him. He in turn genuinely falls in love with her too, and even though he cannot get Ligeia out of his mind, he does try his best with his new wife. 

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What is the truth about Verden? Screenshot by me.

Vincent is excellent as Verden. The character is at first glance the typical Byronic leading man of a Gothic tale, a man of mystery. I love how Vincent draws us in with his performance and makes us at first think he is a heartbroken and damaged man, somewhat akin to Mr. Rochester from Jane Eyre, a man longing to meet a fresher, purer woman to be his great love. While some of that description is true, the more we see of Verden, the more that Vincent alters how he plays the character. Vincent’s performance gets much darker and stranger, and he lets us see that there is something more going on here than the typical Gothic character trope we first imagine and assume. Verden also interestingly turns out to be the real victim of the piece rather than Rowena.  He is also a victim twice over; once due to what we learn has been happening to him, and secondly because of what happens to him at the end of the film. I really like Verden and Rowena and I’m always sad that they don’t get the happiness they deserve, but then it wouldn’t really be a Gothic Horror if that were to happen. 😁

In addition to its intriguing and eerie story, excellent lead and supporting performances, and beautiful costume design, I also want to praise the lovely and suitably atmospheric score by Kenneth V. Jones. The gorgeous cinematography by Hammer regular Arthur Grant is also terrific. 

I’m of the opinion that The Tomb Of Ligeia is one of the best Gothic Horror/Gothic Romances ever put on screen. It’s also a great deal of spooky fun and a real character piece. You could do much worse than spend an hour and a half with Vincent, Elizabeth and company. 

What are your thoughts on the film? 

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Blogathons

Till Death Us Do Part Blogathon: Dragonwyck (1946)

Til death us do part blogathon

Theresa, over at cinemavensessaysfromthecouch, is hosting this blogathon all about murders that occur in a marriage. Be sure to visit her site to read all the entries. I can’t wait to read them all myself.

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Vincent Price as Nicholas. Screenshot by me.

I’m writing about the 1946 film Dragonwyck. The film is directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz, and it is based on the 1944 novel of the same name which was written by Anya Seton. Where do I begin with this one? 

Well, I have to say upfront how much I love this film. I like how it is a mixture of genres, romance, melodrama, suspense and horror are all mingled together to great effect; there’s even a subplot about the ghost of a Van Ryn ancestor who haunts the house! Truly this film has something in it for everyone.

I think Price gives one of the best performances of his entire career in this, and it annoys me that his performance here is rarely mentioned when his best film performances get discussed.

I think that it is such an atmospheric film and I think that the set design for the house interiors is absolutely stunning. This gothic film reminds me somewhat of the story of Jane Eyre. A young woman falls in love with an older man, who she (and we)feel sorry for and believe to be desperate for a different life. There the similarities to Bronte’s tale ends though, as Dragonwyck begins to transform into a dark mixture of murder, drug addiction and madness.

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Gene Tierney as Miranda. Screenshot by me.

I also think that the murder plot (and attempted murder)we see in this film, shows similarities to Hitchcock’s Dial M For Murder.

The murder plot here is practically perfect; it’s downright scary just how close the killer comes to getting away with their crime(like the one planned by Milland’s character in the Hitchcock classic), the first murder goes unsuspected, it is only when another is attempted later that a doctor becomes suspicious and the first is uncovered.

The film is set in America, in the 1840’s. Miranda Wells (Gene Tierney) is a young, sheltered woman who is raised in a God fearing, farming family in Connecticut. Miranda longs for adventure and to be able to see more of the world, than just the small part of America she was raised in. Miranda’s mother (the ever terrific Anne Revere)receives a letter from Nicholas Van Ryn (Vincent Price)a distant and wealthy relative.

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Vivienne Osborne as Johanna. Screenshot by me.

Nicholas invites one of the Wells daughters to live at his house called Dragonwyck and act as companion for his daughter. Miranda accepts the invitation and she and her father, Ephraim (Walter Huston)travel to the city to meet Nicholas. Her father disapproves of him, but Nicholas soon charms him and he permits his daughter to go and work for Nicholas.

Soon Miranda finds herself falling in love with Nicholas and the beautiful house known as Dragonwyck. Nicholas returns her feelings and likes her honesty and outspoken nature. Her presence seems to lift him out of himself and become less distant. She seems to be the medicine he needs to be happy. Nothing can come of their love though, as he is married to the self centred (although as we later learn obviously deeply unhappy and unwanted)Johanna (Vivienne Osborne).

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Nicholas and Miranda enjoy a dance. Screenshot by me.

When Johanna suddenly falls ill and then dies, it would seem that nothing can stand in the way of Nicholas and Miranda’s future happiness. Only the sight of a rare and deadly orchid plant in Johanna’s bedroom seems out of place, and its presence plays on the mind of the attending doctor, Turner(Glenn Langan).

Being unable to prove foul play, but nevertheless highly suspicious the doctor (from a distance)keeps an eye out for the new Mrs. Van Ryn. Later when Miranda also falls dangerously ill, his suspicions prove to be founded in truth. But just who is the murderer? I won’t go into detail about that so as not to spoil the film for anyone who has yet to see it.

This is a dark and atmospheric tale of love, desire, murder and unhappiness. The film looks stunning visually, and the set design and costumes are sumptuous and impressive. One of my favourite films from the 1940’s and a great choice to watch if you’re looking for a spooky tale of murder. Murder is terrifying as it is, but to discover a murder is being planned by someone close to you is another thing entirely and this film captures that.

My favourite scenes are the following. Miranda going to attic and discovering the truth about Nicholas (some powerful acting by Price in that scene). The ball sequence, particularly where Nicholas dances with Miranda and basically says who cares what his neighbours and friends say. Ephraim and Nicholas meeting in the hotel. The doctor telling Miranda he will look after her now. Miranda’s first meeting with Johanna and the house staff.

Price is excellent as the reserved Nicholas. He makes you believe that this man has a terrible life and longs to break free of his dull society. His transformation towards the end of the film is quite a shock and he makes it so convincing and dark.

Gene Tierney is superb as the young woman falling in love for the first time in her life. I also like how she makes Miranda not care one bit for convention and that she always speaks her mind. Miranda is very much her own person.

Vivienne Osborne has the tough job of playing both an annoying and sympathetic character and she does this very well. She manages to make us both pity and dislike Johanna.

Spring Byington provides solid support as the almost otherworldly housekeeper of Dragonwyck. There’s also an appearance by a young Jessica Tandy as the maid who helps Miranda.

Anne Revere and Walter Huston are excellent as Miranda’s parents. Anne does a good job of playing a woman who wants her daughter to be happy and have adventures, but doesn’t want to go against the husband she loves when he says Miranda can’t do certain things. Walter perfectly captures the gruff but loving dad act perfectly.

If you haven’t seen this one yet, then I highly recommend it to you. I’d love to get your thoughts on this one. Please leave your comments below.

Click the link below on the 24th to see all the live posts. https://cinemavensessaysfromthecouch.wordpress.com/2017/07/24/till-death-us-do-part-2/